Interview: Travels with Monsieur Periné


By Don Macica –

Bogotá, Colombia’s capital city, is where it all comes together. Like urban centers everywhere, it attracts people from both rural areas and smaller towns. It is where traditions meet and are fused with energy and experimentation to become something new.

In 2007, university student Catalina Garcia, who was studying anthropology, met Nicolás Junca and Santiago Prieto, a pair of aspiring musicians enthralled by French gypsy jazz. She joined the duo as a singer and they began playing informally for friends at parties, weddings and other gatherings. Catalina was studying French as well, so her language skills and the duo’s musical direction were a perfect fit. Thus was born Monsieur Periné, likely the world’s first and only Colombian gypsy jazz band.

They began performing professionally a few years later. In 2012 they recorded and released their first album, Hecho en Mano, and began to attract attention beyond Colombia. Their second album, Caja de Musica, featured an expanded musical palette and was produced by Eduado Cabra, whom you may know better as Visitante of Calle 13.

“When we recorded our first album, we still hadn’t performed much outside of Colombia.” I’m speaking by phone with Catalina Garcia during a break in rehearsals for a North American tour that will bring them to Thalia Hall in Chicago this Wednesday, March 22. “Our songs were limited a bit by that, although we brought in other Latin influences like boleros. So what we were doing mostly was blending French gypsy jazz with Colombian folkloric sounds, especially in percussion.”

Garcia continues, “That album gave us a chance to tour outside of Colombia and we used those travels as a journal of ideas and impressions when we started working on Caja de Musica. We were very lucky that Eduardo Cabra noticed us and offered to produce, because he had done considerable traveling throughout Latin America to explore those sounds for Calle 13. It was a good fit, and he was a big help in bringing those instruments in and building the songs.”


The results were successful artistically and commercially. You can still hear the gypsy jazz influence on Caja de Musica, but now it is (if I could use a cooking metaphor) a broth to which several other spices and ingredients have been carefully added, resulting in a pan-Latin sancocho where reggae riddims overlay French strumming and jaunty Venezuelan clarinets sit alongside Argentine charango, all of it filtered through Monsieur Periné’s sunny sound.

It was a sound good enough to earn Monsieur Periné a Latin Grammy for Best New Artist in 2015. The band, which has grown to 8 members, is just now beginning to compose songs for its follow up. “We’ve now toured both Europe and North America,” says Garcia. “We’re reaching audiences that aren’t necessarily fans of Latin American music, and we’re meeting and learning from them. We are really excited to be coming back to the United States because there are people from different nationalities and backgrounds that identify with our music. It’s a beautiful place to play.”

The final stop on Monsieur Periné’s 2016 tour was at Pilsen Fest, where they wowed a large audience late into the night, blowing past the curfew that usually closes down street festivals at 10pm. Live, their music takes on yet a third dimension, as they play lengthy instrumental build ups to their songs and follow with extensive soloing in their midsections. Somehow, they make traditional Colombian rhythms one with Benny Goodman’s Sing, Sing, Sing.

It’s great, then, that the first stop on this tour is back in Pilsen, just a bit down 18th Street at the crown jewel of Chicago’s mid-sized music venues. They’ll likely road test some new songs, as they hope to begin recording the new album in June. Garcia tells me that they are working with collaborators on the new songs.  “We did all the composing on our first two albums by ourselves, but this time we want to work with other artists that we admire. Some of them are Colombian, but some are also from other parts of the world. We are looking for ways to learn from other kinds of music than ours. We want to continue to enrich our sound.”
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Monsieur Periné with Dos Santos Anti-Beat Orquesta and Los Gold Fires
Wednesday, March 22, 8PM at Thalia Hall, 1807 S. Allport, Chicago
Tickets at thaliahallchicago.com

Agúzate interview: Miguel Zenón’s Típico


By Don Macica –

Beginning with Jibaro in 2005, Puerto Rican saxophonist Miguel Zenón has conceived and recorded a series of albums built on the Puerto Rican experience. Both Jibaro and 2009’s Esta Plena explored folkloric sources, while 2014’s Alma Adentro interpreted classics from the golden age of Puerto Rican songwriting by such luminaries as Rafael Hernández, Sylvia Rexach and Pedro Flores.  2014 saw the remarkable Identities are Changeable, which based its compositions not on musical sources, but interviews with Puerto Ricans born in the mainland United States that explored their sense of identity.

Each was progressively more complex than the previous. Jibaro was simply a quartet. Esta Plena added additional percussion and Alma Adentro utilized a string ensemble. Identities was a big band album. At the core of all four, though, was Zenón’s quartet. The title of his brand new album, Típico, might lead you to believe that it is a continuation of this conceptually themed series, but it is instead a more purely musical project that takes as its starting point the core experience of that working quartet since 2005: pianist Luis Perdomo, Henry Cole on drums and bassist Hans Glawischnig.

“The title ‘Típico’ refers to something that is customary to a region or a group of people or something that can be related to a specific group of people. And when I was writing the music, I was thinking about the music that identified us as a band.”

I’m speaking with Miguel Zenón by phone as he is preparing to take the quartet to California for the first leg of a Típico tour that will bring him to Chicago’s Jazz Showcase March 9-12.


“I wanted to go back to that initial idea of just writing something for the band and focusing on the things that I feel the band can do well and use the record as a showcase for that.” Zenón continues, “The way we usually put records together, even when there are large ensembles or conceptually bigger projects, they all start with the quartet. The other elements are added to that, but when we go out on tour it’s usually just the quartet again. So this time, when putting this record together, I thought about the music as not just the first layer of a bigger project, but with the band itself as the main attraction.”

In a few of the album’s tracks, sounds and ideas initially created by individual band members figure in the new compositions.  On “Corteza”, Zenón based the melody on a Glawischnig’s bass solo first heard on Esta Plena. “Entre las Raíces” started with a Luis Perdomo piano solo on his album Awareness, while “Las Ramas” takes its starting point from figures that drummer Henry Cole has developed over the years that include his Afrobeat Collective album Roots Before Branches.

I ask Zenón if it’s fair to say that Típico is a more purely musical record. “There definitely isn’t a grand concept on this record. I wanted to do something that was more reflective of our experience as a band. If there’s a concept at all, it’s modern music written for a specific group of players that have developed a language together that we use to communicate with each other and create something that we can communicate to a listener.”

The idea of communicating to a listener interests me. Zenón’s music is quite intricate and carefully planned, but as a listener I’m not thinking about complex time signatures or harmonic cadences. If anything, music provokes a human response, be it pleasure, thoughtfulness, serenity, etc.  I tell Zenón this and ask him to comment on the dynamic between composer, player and listener.

“When I’m putting music together, I’m trying to do it out of a place of truth and an honest representation of who I am. So it really needs to be ‘me’. A lot of things that we do start as ideas or systems or exercises, technical things, but then you want to put that in a context where it relates to a listener. There’s a balance needed between an intellectual level and a more human, sentimental point of view if it’s going to reach someone else besides us. My process is a slow one of putting together various ideas and conceptual things, but then I look for ways to add elements to the mix so I can communicate to other people. “

The ‘típico’ of Típico is this culture that exists within the Miguel Zenón Quartet, and not a reference to a geographical region. The compositions themselves have their origin in Zenón’s experience as both an observer and participant in this culture, with few obvious outside points of reference. There are sonic moments that jump out at me: The studio layering of multiple saxophone and bass lines that open “Ciclo”; a simple and very human whistle that opens the increasingly complex variations of “Las Ramas”; 30 seconds or so of in the pocket vamping from drummer Henry Cole in “Corteza”; the delicate intro to “Cantor”.

None of these compositions are likely to bring to mind Latin music. There are, however, two tracks that do conjure this feeling, one deliberately and the other, I believe, naturally flowing out of Zenón’s Puerto Rican heritage.

The lovely melody at the heart of Sangre de mi Sangre (inspired by Zenón watching his daughter play in a park) has a lyrical beauty that sounds like it could have appeared on Alma Adentro.  “I actually wrote lyrics to that melody when I first sketched it out. I was watching her play and thinking about our connection, then also thinking about my parents and how they probably felt about me when I was young,” Zenón continues, “In a sense, the version that appears on the record resulted from the same sort of process that I used on Alma Adentro – start with the melody of an existing song, then build a new arrangement from that. We’ve never played it with the lyrics, but I always think about them when I play it.”

The title track makes explicit reference to Latin folkloric music. “I was trying to capture a specific feeling of folklore, specifically this harmonic cadence that I recognize in a lot of the music I like from Latin America. I played around with this cadence a lot of different ways and combined it with different elements and rhythms. Even though it is an original composition, it evokes that folkloric sound when you hear it.”

I jokingly tell Zenón that the piano intro to “Típico” sounds like a montuno played upside down, but to my surprise he readily agrees. “That’s exactly what it is,” he says. “We’re trying to play around with it, sort of like it’s a mirage of something that’s there, but at the same time, not there. I was trying to emulate a feeling I get when I listen to that music, but not the actual music itself.”

Miguel Zenón is no stranger to Chicago. He was here twice in 2016. In the spring he presented Identities are Changeable in concert at the Logan Center and conducted a discussion and performance of its themes and sources at Segundo Ruiz Belvis Cultural Center. He returned to Chicago in early fall to perform Yo Soy La Tradición, a world premiere work for saxophone and string quartet, at the Hyde Park Jazz Festival. The Miguel Zenón Quartet, however, hasn’t been at the intimate confines of the Jazz Showcase since 2015. When I spoke to Zenón prior to that appearance, he said, “I feel honored that we have become part of the musical family at the Jazz Showcase for so many years now. (Showcase owners) Joe and Wayne (Segal) have a long history of supporting younger bandleaders, especially Latin American musicians such as Danilo Pérez and David Sánchez, both of whom have already become such an integral part of the history of the club. I look forward to performing at this great venue for many years to come.”

Better now than later.
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Miguel Zenón Quartet, Jazz Showcase March 9-12. Shows at 8 & 10pm plus 4pm all ages matinee on Sunday. Info and advance tickets at jazzshowcase.com.

Extended Play: Crossing neighborhood borders with a world of music

Herencia de Timbiquí

By Don Macica –

If you live in Chicago and experience live Latin and world music on a regular basis, chances are you know, or at least have seen, Mateo Mulcahy. If you recognize the name, it’s because you know he’s the guy who brings all the cool world music to the Old Town School of Folk Music, located in the city’s north side Lincoln Square neighborhood.

Unlike a commercial talent booker or promoter, though, Mulcahy has a broader mission. The Old Town School is a non-for-profit organization, and Mulcahy is its Director of Community Projects and Events. He’s leading a new initiative called Extended Play that launches on February 1 in partnership with institutions in two other parts of the city; The DuSable Museum of African American History on the south side in Hyde Park and Segundo Ruiz Belvis Cultural Center in Hermosa on the west side.

Mateo Mulcahy was born in Chicago. He has both Mexico and Ireland in his heritage and grew up in a bilingual household. He spent several years in St. Louis leading a salsa band, hosting a radio show, promoting live Latin and world music and even owning a nightclub. These various capacities allowed him to make connections with that city’s various ethnic communities and continually expand his network. At times he reproduced shows in St. Louis that originated at the Old Town School’s La Peña series. Upon returning to Chicago in 2006, he was hired by the School to take over La Peña, but his background of working with many diverse communities led to him also programming the School’s Afro-Folk series and being assigned the broader task of connecting the School to communities beyond its immediate geographical area and to create more diversity at the school itself.

Mateo Mulcahy

“We (the Old Town School) pull almost exclusively from a 20 block radius of the building,” Mulcahy tells me over coffee in the school’s main performance hall. “but we always have had an interest in expanding our reach into the south and west sides. Early on I took Afro-Folk out to the South Shore Cultural Center and we hoped to extend classes out there as well.”  That effort ran out of funding pretty quickly, and Mulcahy has been searching for a way ever since to do something similar.

The Old Town School’s reputation beyond Chicago is highly regarded. “I can’t tell you how many artists that I work with say that they wish their cities had something like the Old Town School. New York City, London, Memphis, it doesn’t matter,” says Mulcahy. “There might be programs there that do something similar, but their focus is usually narrower, aimed at a particular community. The Old Town School’s mission tries to reach out to all of Chicago’s communities. We are the largest community arts school in the country.”

Even so, Mulcahy recognizes that there is unequal distribution of arts activity and education in Chicago. “There’s our 20 block radius, but virtually 90% of the city’s arts organizations are either downtown or on the north side like us. Vast parts of the city get very little.”

Cooperation between the Old Town School and community partners is crucial. A recently created 2 person engagement department has made these citywide partnerships more feasible. Last year’s 77 Beats program sought to celebrate the music and food of Chicago’s 77 distinct neighborhoods by producing over 45 events throughout the city in everything from cultural centers to parks and festivals, often utilizing the resources and talent in those neighborhoods.

Extended Play, which will bring Afro-Latin artists to Chicago this year, is a further step in that direction. As its name implies, the series extends the School’s long-running World Music Wednesday to three days and two additional venues. “We need to partner with organizations in other parts of the city and not keep everything to ourselves over there,” he says, gesturing toward the darkened stage. “Correspondingly, it is a benefit for the artists who come a long way to perform in Chicago to get the opportunity to play more than once.” Like 77 Beats, Extended Play is funded by the Chicago Community Trust, who have in recent years begun to focus more on the city’s under served neighborhoods.

El Tuyero Ilustrado

The partner organization’s missions are crucial to the programming decisions as well. Artists are selected in close consultation with partner venues to ensure that they reflect the programming objectives and mission of all institutions. In the case of this year’s launch of Extended Play, the thread that connects the DuSable Museum and Segundo Ruiz Belvis is the African Diaspora. The initial artists that will perform include El Tuyero Ilustrado, who play joropo music from Venezuela, and Colombia’s Herencia de Timbiquí. Artists perform for three consecutive days. In keeping with outreach goals, all concerts are free to the public.

“I can’t tell you how pleased I am that I was able to get artists of this high caliber to launch this series,” Mulcahy says with a big smile. “Herencia de Timbiquí are superstars in Colombia, and El Tuyero Ilustrado are truly at the forefront of the joropo tuyero movement.”

Like a lot of Chicagoans, I first heard Herencia de Timbiquí at last year’s World Music Festival, and their show at Pritzker Pavilion was one of my personal fest high points. The 10-man ensemble mines a rich vein of traditional rhythms and instruments from Colombia’s Afro-Pacific region while modernizing it just enough to not sound like an anthropology lesson. They will be here in April.

El Tuyero Ilustrado, who kick off the series this Wednesday, are making their first appearance in Chicago. The duo consists of cuatro virtuoso Edward Ramírez and composer/singer/maraca player Rafa Pino. The project combines the joropo from the central region of Venezuela with original songwriting and uses the cuatro as a main instrument, rather than the more traditional arpa llanero.

Mulcahy discovered them at a music conference in Caracas and was totally blown away. “Venezuela has an incredibly diverse and rich musical offering,” says Mulcahy, “but joropo is the national music and the cuatro is definitely the national instrument. However, if you are going to replace a harp which has dozens of strings with a cuatro that has 4, it better be one incredible cuatro player. Edward Ramírez is at that level.”

Mulcahy and I end our conversation talking about Chicago’s world music community. “I’ve worked in other markets,” he says, “and I’m very happy to report that, in Chicago, the people who work on the cultural side of Latin and world music all get along and collaborate. It’s not a given that it works like that in other places. And working together enables us to get great artists to come to Chicago that individually we couldn’t afford.”

Extended Play works much the same way. It would simply not be possible to get El Tuyero Ilustrado or Herencia de Timbiquí to come all the way to Chicago for a single audience of a few hundred people. That makes us a very lucky city indeed.
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Extended Play: El Tuyero Ilustrado
Old Town School of Folk Music, Wednesday February 1 at 8:30pm. oldtownschool.org
DuSable Museum of African American History, Thursday February 2 at 7pm. dusablemuseum.org
Segundo Ruiz Belvis Cultural Center, Friday February 3 at 7:30pm. segundoruizbelvis.org

Extended Play: Herencia de Timbiquí
Segundo Ruiz Belvis Cultural Center, Tuesday April 18 at 7:30pm
Old Town School of Folk Music, Wednesday April 19 at 8:30pm
DuSable Museum of African American History, Thursday April 20 at 7pm

Luciano Antonio’s Brazilian jazz finds its audience


– By Don Macica

“I was finding myself in Chicago every weekend, commuting from Kansas City, because Chicago was where the opportunity to play was.”

I’m speaking with Luciano Antonio, who has quietly but steadily become a major force in Chicago’s Brazilian music scene.  Born in the rural town of Iretama in the southern Brazilian state of Parana, Antonio has been performing here since 1994. The first decade or so of that was playing guitar in existing ensembles like Chicago Samba, Bossa Tres and Orquesta de Samba, but eventually he began to step out as a bandleader in his own right, releasing his first album of original music, Vida de Arista (An Artist’s Life), in 2011. A second album, Sem Palavras (Without Words), followed in 2015.

Luciano, who was born into a musical family, taught himself to play guitar at the age of 14. He initially focused on Brazilian folk and Bossa Nova, but was soon studying classical guitar, eventually heading to the United States and Kansas City, earning a Bachelor of Music degree at the University of Missouri. It was there he met the leader of Chicago Samba, Moacyr Marchini, who invited him to join the group. By 1999, what started out as a few trips a year turned into a weekly gig. “I would travel here every Thursday afternoon, play the gig, sleep for a an hour and a half at the drummer’s house, then fly back to Kansas City in the morning because I couldn’t miss class.”

He continues, “Chicago Samba is a party band and plays everything: Bossa Nova, pagode, axé, Olodum, fricote… I still play all of that with my dance group project, Planeta Azul, but my original music tends to be a little quieter, music designed for listening instead of dancing.”

In 2002, Luciano finally moved here. Chicago is now home, the place he returns to after his tours Italy, China, and Brazil. If you go out for live music in Chicago, chances are you’ll encounter Luciano in one form or another on a regular basis. In addition to Planeta Azul, he performs as a solo singer-guitarist, in an occasional duo with the superb Brazilian vocalist Silvia Manrique, in the interesting new project AMA led by drummer Luiz Ewerling that features vocalist Ana Munteanu, and, of course, leading his own quintet.

His rigorous classical guitar study has payed off. He’s a terrific and fluid guitarist who is comfortable improvising. Additionally, Luciano is a fine singer whose voice carries that essential but hard to describe sense of Brazilian saudade.

It’s this quintet that has been playing a weeknight gig several times a year at Chicago’s renowned Jazz Showcase, where he now has a full weekend of shows scheduled starting January 26-29, a coveted spot that is usually reserved for national artists.

“Planeta Azul is meant for dancing, and I enjoy playing that kind of music very much. But at the Jazz Showcase, I can open up the music to improvisation, what is called Brazilian jazz, because I have a listening audience. I have the room to take the music where it can go.”

Luciano notes that he draws from a range of influences to compose and play this more intimate music. “Everything from the Beatles to the top artists of of Brazilian MPB (Música popular brasileira) including Milton Nascimento, Djavan, Chico Buarque, Gilberto Gil and Caetano Veloso. Some American pop and, of course, jazz.”

The Jazz Showcase quintet will include Neal Alger, one of Chicago’s best jazz guitarists, and a young Brazilian pianist, Gabriel Alves, who has studied here in Chicago with the legendary Willie Pickens. Rounding out the lineup are bassist Geoffrey Lowe and drummer Luiz Ewerling, who are also Luciano’s band mates in AMA. Joining them as special guests are vocalist Neusa Sauer and her husband Breno.

“Neusa and Breno came out of Brazil in the 1960s and settled in Chicago in the 70s. They’re both legends and Chicago is so lucky to have them. If you’ve never heard Neusa sing, you are in for a real treat. This weekend is something of a tribute to them.”

Luciano takes a moment to reflect on his time in Chicago. “I’ve been on the Chicago scene for something like 22 years. It’s really a great city, and I feel like getting a weekend at the Jazz Showcase is something of an acknowledgement that I’m a true Chicago artist.

“I’ll always love Carnaval music, dancing, high energy stuff. Samba and party music are great. But for me, personally, I want people to hear the nuances in my music, and I really appreciate that there is a place like Jazz Showcase where people will listen. The audience offers me their ears and their attention, and the challenge to me is to reward them for it by being as musical as I can.”
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Luciano Antonio Quintet with special guests Neusa and Breno Sauer.
Jazz Showcase, January 26-29, shows at 8 & 10pm.
jazzshowcase.com

Urban Pilón, Recalling Roots to Lead a Chicago Culinary Movement

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[Editor’s note: Although we mostly cover music at Agúzate, it must be noted that the word ‘Culture’ is in our title as well. Readers may recognize the subject of this piece as a member of Bomba con Buya, the world class traditional Puerto Rican ensemble that calls Chicago home. However, his commitment to culture runs deeper than just music. Read on, and enjoy!]

By Parker Asmann
all photos courtesy of Urban Pilón

If there’s one utensil that’s been historically essential in Latin American cuisine, it’s the pilón. In the late 15th century, the Taíno indians who occupied the West Indies were documented to have used many variations of the pilón for cooking, sometimes made out of large hollowed out tree trunks. Today, variations of that same utensil line the walls of Roberto Pérez’s kitchen to fuel his own culinary movement, Urban Pilón.

Formed in 2012 with longtime friend and fellow cultural worker Angel Fuentes, Urban Pilón is a culinary movement that has set out to share the rich traditions and roots of Puerto Rican, Caribbean and Latin American food. Through a traditional approach to cooking that uses fresh vegetables, herbs and spices from the garden, and a hard line against any additives or preservatives, Urban Pilón creates healthy and innovative dishes unlike what’s on other menus in Chicago.

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Angel Fuentes and Roberto Pérez

When most people think of the culinary capitals of the world, colonizing nations like Spain, France and Portugal come to mind. However, Pérez explained that Urban Pilón’s cooking philosophy revolves around looking within to his own family, their Taíno past and African roots.

“Even in Puerto Rican cooking, sometimes those roots are shunned when they aren’t a part of the norm,” Pérez said. “In a lot of our cooking we really try and dig deep into some older recipes that people may not want to do or are embarrassed to do, recipes that have heavy stigmas. We love doing those recipes and doing things that not everybody embraces.”

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El pilón

As has been the unfortunate case for far too many indigenous populations throughout the Americas, many of their people, traditions and languages have been wiped away as a result of colonization, leading to their displacement and eventual extinction. Urban Pilón draws their motivation from their desire to keep their roots and traditions alive.

“A lot of what we’ve learned has come from talking to elders and traveling,” Pérez said. “We’re very available and interested in doing those things. For example, one experience that comes to mind was going to Veracruz and sitting down with folks who really knew how to cook and just learning from them, drawing comparisons and using new techniques in our own cooking.”

Since 2012, Urban Pilón has grown in more ways than Pérez and Fuentes could have imagined when they were originally tossing the idea around. In the years since, Urban Pilón has hosted several dinner parties with the aim of bringing different people from different communities together to enjoy the experience of cooking and sharing a meal.

Pérez credits Urban Pilón’s ability to evolve and grow so much over the years to their willingness to be open and to learn from those around them. Aside from starting Chicago’s first Caribbean food blog, Urban Pilón has performed several cooking demonstrations and hosted a handful of cooking classes. Pérez stressed that Urban Pilón likes to think of the culinary world as an open book, and that’s very much reflected in the openness the two showcase with their cooking knowledge.

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Urban Pilón cooking class

“We’ve had the opportunity to sit down with folks who really know how to cook,” Pérez said, “and they’ve been unbelievably kind and open with us. So really it’s just our way of treating those we cook and interact with the same way that we’ve been treated, with the same hospitality we’ve been provided.”

More than anything, though, Urban Pilón is all about bringing people together. When Pérez isn’t gathering people around a stage in the name of music with his bomba ensemble, Bomba con Buya, he shifts settings into the kitchen. Food and cooking have always had a unique ability to draw similarities between cultures, people and traditions without uttering a single word. In staying true to their commitment to preserving their Puerto Rican traditions, Urban Pilón have traveled extensively and spoken with many elders to try and connect with the roots their trying to reestablish through their cooking.

“One day we hope to be able to put together a recipe book,” Pérez said. “Angel and I have both been lucky enough to spend time and learn about our cooking traditions from elders, so it would be great to be able to put all of those things together in a book so we can continue to preserve those roots.”

One of the ways Pérez works to broaden his horizons and expand his culinary expertise in Chicago is by volunteering at a soul food restaurant whenever he has the opportunity. Aside from the natural enjoyment he gets from cooking, Pérez explained that he uses the opportunity to continue to learn and develop his knowledge in the kitchen, taking the new things he learns and incorporating them into Urban Pilón’s own cooking.

Pérez in the kitchen
Pérez in the kitchen

What makes Urban Pilón even more influential to Chicago’s culinary movement is their commitment to creating healthy dishes. Pérez explained that he feels that it wasn’t until society moved towards what he calls a ‘quick fix’ way of living that the quality of food started to decline. Instead of people harvesting vegetables and other ingredients planted and grown from gardens or small plots of land, companies have capitalized on that need for quick and easy consumption by using artificial ingredients and preservatives.

As an example, Pérez pointed to Goya and their premade sofrito base. Sofrito is a staple sauce used in Latin American cooking as a base for rice, beans, soups, chilis and stews. While at one time it was customary to make your own sofrito base from scratch using fresh ingredients, now more often than not people purchase this base from grocery stores. Urban Pilón goes beyond just sofrito, though. In every one of their cooking classes, all of the ingredients are 100 percent natural and they share their knowledge of cooking things from scratch, the traditional way.

For those interested in getting involved, Urban Pilón has their third meal sharing event lined up for Monday, Dec. 5. This time around it’s going to be Mofongo Monday, which embodies every aspect of traditional Puerto Rican cuisine through the Puerto Rican dish’s African origins and fried plantain base that’s mashed together with salt, garlic and oil in none other than a pilón.

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The class enjoys the meal they made together.

“Moving forward we at Urban Pilón just want to continue to bring people together and share these recipes through our cooking classes and other events,” Pérez said. “For us this is so much more than cooking, it’s a passion and an artistic expression all while showcasing the traditions of our culture.”
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Learn more about Urban Pilón, including some great recipes, at urbanpilon.com.
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About the author: Parker Asmann is a freelance reporter based in Chicago focusing on Latin America and the Latinx community. His work has been featured in El BeiSMan and In These Times magazine, as well as The Yucatan Times and San Miguel Times in México.

Interview with Omara Portuondo: “I’m grateful to do what I love most.”

Omara Portuondo 2014
Photo credit: Fernand Forcade

By Don Macica –

Many of us made it out to Ravinia last summer to catch the Buena Vista Social Club’s “Adiós Tour.” By this time, sadly, several of the legends who rocketed to worldwide fame in the 1990s were no longer with us, most notably Compay Segundo, Ibrahim Ferrer and Rubén Gonzáles. Still, it was definitely worth the trip up to Highland Park to revel in nostalgia one more time.

There is one member of this club, however, who not only still walks the planet, but has no intention of saying adiós: Omara Portuondo. This year finds the legendary Cuban vocalist back out on the road for her “85 Tour,” named for the birthday that she will celebrate later this month. Don’t mistake this for another nostalgia fest, though. The world tour, which comes to Symphony Center on October 21, finds her accompanied by an all-star band of first rate jazz musicians, including American violinist Regina Carter, Israeli clarinetist Anat Cohen and Cuban pianist Roberto Fonseca, whose band (Yandy Martinez, Ramsés Rodríguez and Andrés Coayo) powers the rhythm section.

The standard narrative that accompanies the BVSC phenomenon is that these amazing artists were rescued from obscurity by Ry Cooder and filmmaker  Wim Wenders. There is some truth in that, but it doesn’t apply to all of its members. In fact, Portuondo was actively performing and recording in the years immediately preceding the release of the BVSC album and movie. She has been active separately from the group in the years since as well, singing with everyone from the flamenco star Diego El Cigala to American avant-garde saxophonist David Murray and Brazilian singer Maria Bethânia.

Magia Negra
Omara Portuondo circa 1959

Omara Portuondo was kind enough to answer a few of my questions via e-mail. The following responses have minor edits for clarity.

Don Macica – The common assumption in the United States is that your career, along with many of your colleagues in the film and album Buena Vista Social Club, was revived, even rescued by that project. It’s true that world wide fame followed it, but tell me a bit more about the years from 1967 up until the late 1990’s.

Omara Portuondo – Well, some of us were active. Actually I was invited to join the band because I was recording and they invited me to sing with Ibrahim Ferrer. I started [my career] dancing with my sister at the Tropicana, and from then I joined the Loquibamba, Cuarteto las D’aida, until the moment I recorded my first solo album in 1959, Magia Negra. I joined Orquesta Aragón in the 1970s [and] recorded albums with Adalberto Alvarez and Chucho Valdes… Some people do not know that, but I toured a lot before the success of Buena Vista.

(Editor’s Note: I did a bit of research, and there’s even more to the pre-BVSC years, including a 1983 documentary and being awarded an Alejo Carpentier Award for artistic achievement in 1988.)

DM – After over half a century of singing, what keeps you going? Has your work with younger musicians like Roberto Fonseca introduced another phase?

OP – Music is my life. It’s the source to keep going, along with my son and my granddaughter. I love what I do, and when this happens things are easier. Well, it does not mean that you have to be lazy. You have to work hard, but when things comes from your heart, people can feel it.

DM – You’ll be accompanied by a pair of incredible jazz musicians, Regina Carter and Anat Cohen, who aren’t particularly known for playing Latin music, although Cohen loves Brazilian choro. What can we expect from this collaboration and concert?

OP – Oh, I’m so excited and happy about this. For my 85th anniversary tour I wanted to invite artists that I admire and that could give a personal touch to the music. They are very talented and they understand perfectly the music connection. Your know, music is universal and we are simply enjoying so much of the reunion.

DM – Last summer’s BVSC tour was the “Adiós” tour, but you are still going strong. Any plans for retirement?

OP – Retirement? I’m just a young girl! There are some good things happening, a documentary movie, a lot of ideas, recordings… I’m grateful to do what I love most.
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Omara Portuondo at Symphony Center. Friday, October 21 at 8:00PM. Tickets at cso.org.

Harold López-Nussa: The next great Cuban jazz pianist?

Harold López-Nussa
photo: Eduardo Rodriguez

By Don Macica –

When producer and DJ Gilles Peterson went to Havana in 2009 to explore a new generation of young Cuban musicians for his first Havana Cultura project, he encountered plenty of vocalists with talent to burn. It was from that album that I first learned about Daymé Arocena, Melvis Santa, Telmary Diaz and Danay Suárez. Helping him find these talented artists was the Cuban-born pianist Roberto Fonseca, who had toured the world with the Buena Vista Social Club and released a handful of critically acclaimed albums. Tucked away among the many singers and rappers who populated the albums 27 tracks was one outlier: Jazz pianist Harold López-Nussa, who closed the album like a Cuban Herbie Hancock with the lively La Jungla.

Now, through some wonderful cosmic alignment, Chicago will host both López-Nussa and Fonseca in the next week. The latter is part of an all-star band supporting Omara Portuondo, but it’s Lopez-Nussa that is touring behind a brand new album, the terrific El Viaje (Mack Avenue Records), and leading his own trio at Evanston SPACE on October 19.

The conservatory-trained pianist has actually been on the scene for over a decade, and this is certainly not his first trip off the island. He can be heard supporting David Sánchez, Stefon Harris and Christian Scott on their Cuban excursion Ninety Miles, recorded in Havana in 2010. He, too, has toured the world with Omara Portuondo and other musicians associated with the Buena Vista Social Club. El Viaje, notably, is the first international release of a Cuba-based artist since the lifting of restrictions associated with the longstanding trade embargo between the U.S. and Cuba, and López-Nussa’s subsequent U.S. tour follows in its wake.

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But enough of context. On to the music!

López-Nussa is a superb pianist regardless of whether he is hewing to traditional Cuban folkloric sources or straying farther afield to straight ahead jazz, pan-African influences (his bass player and sometimes singer Alune Wade hails from Senegal) or even into tango and other South American sounds. Tracks alternate between the serene and introspective (the title track and the breathtakingly lovely Oriente) to lively and percussive (Bacalao con Pan, Feria), but overall the feeling is relaxed, not frantic. It feels as though López-Nussa has already figured out that he doesn’t need to show off his virtuosity, but just play. To these ears, the record sounds something like Weather Report in their prime, with its comfortable coexistence of global influences residing in the same song, propelled along by Wade’s electric bass.

The same tune opens and closes the album, Me Voy pa’ Cuba. It appears first as a bright and cheerful danzón that morphs into some furious piano runs, then returns as the framework for a boisterous rumba jam. In between are stops on a journey that begins and ends in Havana, but finds plenty of inspiration along the way.
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Harold López-Nussa Trio, Wednesday, October 19, 7:30pm, Evanston SPACE, 1245 Chicago Ave, Evanston. Tickets at evanstonspace.com

Preview: Caetano Veloso at Symphony Center

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By Don Macica –

There is a saying that goes something like this: If you live long enough, you become respectable. It’s a phrase that comes to mind almost every time I consider the life and music of Caetano Veloso. Revolutionary avant-gardist of the Tropicalia movement in the 1960s and forced into exile, he is now perhaps the ultimate Brazilian icon, on par with his hero, the late João Gilberto. It’s been that way since at least the 1980s, when he was described in the American press as something of a cross between the Beatles, Bob Dylan and Michael Jackson, a massively popular and influential musician that is also a poet and incisive observer of Brazilian society.

I’ve been fortunate to see Veloso in concert twice in the last twenty years, and both times he was accompanied by a full band supporting him with lush harmonics, Afro-Brazilian rhythms and bracing modernism. Now, on the heels of his appearance at the opening ceremonies of the Rio Olympics with his friend and fellow Tropicalia legend Gilberto Gil, Symphony Center is bringing him to Chicago with just his voice, guitar and one very special guest, samba singer Teresa Cristina, a respected artist in Brazil and founding member of the Carioca samba movement.

Caetano Veloso’s voice, at the age of 74, remains a supple and beautiful instrument. If anything, his phrasing is even better, in the manner of a jazz musician who never stops seeking the most meaningful way to play a series of notes. As an artist, Veloso is still something of an adventurer, seeking new sounds and youthful collaborators, as on his most recent studio release, Abraçaço.

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Caetano Veloso and Gilberto Gil, circa 1970

A better indication to what to expect in this concert, though, might be his recent live album with Gilberto Gil, Dois Amigos, um Século de Música, in which the two old friends from Bahia are accompanied only by their own guitars, singing each others songs from the last 50 years along with favorites of theirs written by others.

Since the mid 1980s, Nonesuch Records has done North America a huge service by releasing Caetano Veloso’s albums here. Now, they are doing the same for Rio de Janeiro native Teresa Cristina, making her new Canta Cartola album, recorded live with guitarist Carlinhos Sete Cordas, available mere months after its Brazilian release. It’s a beautiful and intimately recorded document of a special night in Rio. Her Symphony Center appearance will find her accompanied by the guitarist as well.

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On Canta Cartola, Cristina eschews the exuberant rhythms and high energy level normally associated with samba, instead burrowing into the heart of the songs for the saudade within. Veloso will do much the same in this similarly intimate context, revisiting his 50 year catalog with the sort of nuance that can only come with the simplicity of voice and guitar.

Their Symphony Center show is one of only four scheduled in the United States, and two of them are in New York City. That alone makes this night a special one indeed.
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Caetano Veloso with Teresa Cristina, Symphony Center, Sunday October 16, 7:00PM. Tickets at CSO.org

Appreciation: SRBCC’s 45th Anniversary Celebration

SRBCC music
Clockwise from upper left: Buya, Pirulo y la Tribu, Roy McGrath, Arawak’Opia

By Don Macica, Photos by Charlie Billups –

There was a moment midway through the evening when things got a little emotional. Segundo Ruiz Belvis Cultural Center Executive Director Omar Torres-Kortright (full disclosure: Torres-Kortright is also Agúzate’s founder) was talking about how, shortly after he first arrived in Chicago upon graduating from the University of Puerto Rico, the homesick young man began to seek out expressions of Puerto Rican culture in the city. He learned about SRBCC and showed up one day, where he was welcomed with open arms and, as he noted, “never asked for a penny.”

He took some percussion classes, but soon learned that “being a musician wasn’t exactly my calling”. Nonetheless, he stuck around and gradually deepened his involvement, eventually joining the organization’s board. Then, in early 2015, SRBCC found itself without a director. Torres-Kortright, by now a successful private sector executive, knew that his heart was with the organization and took a leap of faith to apply for the job.

Torres-Kortright voice wavered with emotion several times while relating this tale and that of his subsequent appointment. It only became more teary as he described the organization’s mission and the youth it serves. He mentioned the achievements of his tenure, but not in the sense of look what I did. Instead, it was more I can’t believe the incredible privilege that I’ve been granted.

The 45th Anniversary Gala for Segundo Ruiz Belvis Cultural Center at the Old Town School of Folk Music was a time to pause and celebrate, and they did it in the best way possible: with music. As percussionist John Santos noted in a recent talk at SRBCC, “My music is who I am.” Such is the power of music in Afro-Latin life.

The program was sequenced in a way that traveled back & forth through time. First up was the SRBCC’s youth bomba ensemble, Arawak’Opia, whom the center will send to Puerto Rico in January to directly experience boricua culture and study with masters. They were quickly followed by Buya, Chicago’s (and perhaps the United States’) finest professional bomba ensemble, many of whom first learned how to play decades ago at SRBCC.

Torres-Kortright’s remarks followed, and then he introduced saxophonist Roy McGrath, a fiercely talented jazz musician born in Puerto Rico but now living in Chicago. McGrath designed and leads the Center’s Afro-Caribbean Youth Jazz Program, and his trio performed a version of Rafael Hernández’ Perfume de Gardenias that matched McGrath’s inventive improvisation to folkloric drumming in stunning fashion.

Francisco "Pirulo" Rosado and Omar Torres-Kortright
Francisco “Pirulo” Rosario and Omar Torres-Kortright

Finally, it was time for the headliner, whom Torres-Kortright personally recruited on a trip home earlier this year. Pirulo y la Tribu are without a doubt the most exciting salsa band on the island.  They smoothly incorporate Cuban son and other Afro-Caribbean sounds, but they are unapologetically committed to salsa as their foundation and means of expression. The group is led by timbalero Francisco “Pirulo” Rosado, a charismatic, dreadlocked, baseball cap outfitted singer who one could easily mistake for a rapper or reggaeton artist. His youthful 8-piece band, wearing matching Cangrejeros de Santurce Roberto Clemente t-shirts,  is salsa to the core, including a smokin’ horn section. Pirulo y la Tribu come hard, infusing the music with energy, attitude and, above all, crack musicianship. They filled the dance floor from the very first note, the joyous crowd singing every chorus and punctuating every call and response. I’d call them the future of salsa, but they are already here, tu sabes?

It was, in short, an incredible night. The concert over, it seemed no one wanted to go home. People filled the lobby, but even as they exited, they lingered on the sidewalk, not quite ready to let go of the magic.

Of course, there is no need to let go. Better to think of SRBCC’s past 45 years as the foundation for another 45 as a beacon of culture and community. There’s plenty of magic to come.

Review / Preview: New Music from Dos Santos: Anti-Beat Orquesta

Dos Santos
By Don Macica –

With Fonografic, their new EP, Chicago’s Dos Santos: Anti-Beat Orquesta find themselves getting comfortable in their own skin and refining their many influences into something unique and wholly theirs. And, as is often the case, it’s the guidance of an outside producer that helps them get there.

When I first encountered Dos Santos at a Rogers Park street festival in the summer of 2013, they were practically brand new. At the time, much of their musical hat was hung on chicha, an immensely danceable and stripped-down psychedelic Peruvian variant on Colombian cumbia. You can still hear traces of cumbia rhythms and the hallucinogenic feel remains, but now a host of pan-Latin sounds and big, meaty funk and rock riffing have asserted themselves in the mix.

To record Fonografic, the band traveled to Austin, Texas and enlisted Beto Martinez of the Grammy award-winning Grupo Fantasma as producer. This assistance finds them working on a much larger aural canvas and lending the tracks an almost cinematic feel (their video for the driving twang of Camino Infernal reinforces an impression that this would make great theme music for the next twisted Robert Rodriguez epic).

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Dos Santos is, ostensibly, songwriter-guitarist-organist-singer Alex Chavez’s band, but the contributions of all five members (in addition to Chavez, there is bassist Jaime Garza, drummer Daniel Villarreal-Carrillo, conguero Pete Vale and newest member Nathan Karagianas on second guitar) loom large in the sound. The percussive tandem of Vale and Villarreal-Carrillo has gelled into a powerhouse duo, especially on the descarga ¡Cafeteando!, which features guest trombonist Mark “Speedy” Gonzales and sounds something like a lost Willie Colón track driven through a Colombian pico and turned up to maximum volume.

Two other tracks are especially notable for the way they diverge from the band’s chicha beginnings. Santa Clara is an optimistic sounding tropical Latin tune that Chavez wrote years ago, and has the sunny feel of Los Amigos Invisibles at their best. At the other end of the emotional and sonic spectrum is the second half of Red, a slow and sinister bit of R&B balladry punctuated by Chavez’ wounded howl of “Ay, amor!”.

They do all of this in seven brief tracks that total less than 30 minutes, which suggests to me that Dos Santos is anything but a self-indulgent jam band, and that every note they commit to is played with purpose. There is no doubt more where that came from, and we’ll hopefully get to hear them stretch out at this Saturday’s CD release concert for Fonografic at the Hideout. $10 gets you in, but $15 gets you in and a copy of the CD.

Dos Santos: Anti-Beat Orquesta with special guests, October 1, 9PM (doors 8:30) at The Hideout, 1354 W. Wabansia Ave, Chicago. Tickets at Ticketfly.
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About the author: Don Macica is Agúzate’s content manager, a marketing consultant to the performing arts community and a contributing writer to several online publications. When not traveling, he lives a stone’s throw from Lake Michigan in Chicago’s Rogers Park neighborhood. He also writes Border Radio, a blog about music, migration and cultural exchange.