Concert Review: ¡Súbelo! at World Music Festival Chicago

By Don Macica, photos by Charlie Billups

Chicago’s Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events, which helps present the city’s many free festivals along with other programming throughout the year, has increasingly recognized the growth and diversity of Chicago’s many Latino communities. It was not only appropriate, but savvy, that one of the first major shows of this year’s World Music Festival Chicago, falling on a weekend in which Central America nations and Mexico both celebrate their independence, would draw from Mexico, Peru and Puerto Rico for its first ever all-Latin American show. Dubbed “¡Súbelo! – A Celebration of Pan Latin Music & Culture”, it took place at the Jay Pritzker Pavilion at Millennium Park.

Summer-like temperatures and abundant sunshine greeted Mexico City’s “Electrónica Regional Mexicana” band Centavrvs, cumbia amazónica pioneers Los Wemblers de Iquitos, and Puerto Rico’s Pirulo y la Tribu, whose 21st century salsa borrows elements from Cuban timba, hip-hop, bomba and R&B.

Centavrvs

Although a band like Centavrvs might seem to fall outside of Agúzate’s dedication to Afro-Latin music, their sound carries many tropical influences including cumbia, cha-cha-chá, danzón and even some vintage salsa, smoothly integrated into their widescreen corrido-like narratives. That’s not surprising, given the way that cumbia has migrated across Latin America and the Caribbean influences that enter Mexico through the port city of Veracruz.

This is, by my count, Centavrvs third visit to Chicago, the first one being at the much missed Celebrate Clark Street Festival in Rogers Park and the second paired with Guatemalan singer Gaby Moreno at a 2017 Millennium Park Summer Music Series show. Each time the band comes their sound gets a little bigger and more compelling, and this time around they’ve added a Venezuelan percussionist to the mix to bring the tropical elements more to the foreground. Electronic effects and samples blended seamlessly with guitar, bass and drums to powerful effect.

Los Wemblers de Iquitos

When cumbia reached Peru from Colombia in the late 1960s, it found a receptive audience among the country’s marginalized, indigenous population, who blended it with local sounds and a big helping of rock guitar. This was certainly true in urban centers like Lima, but no less so in seemingly isolated towns deep in the Amazon. It was there that a genre variously known as chicha, psychedelic cumbia and cumbia amazónica was taken up in the town of Iquitos by Los Wemblers. The veteran ensemble made several classics in the 1970s, including one that served as yet another name for the genre: Sonido Amazonico. They were discovered by a wider audience earlier in this century after Barbès Records included some of their songs in their “Roots of Chicha” compilation. Collaborations with the Meridian Brothers and Dengue Dengue Dengue led to them recording the brand-new album “Vision del Ayahuasca” for Barbès and now a world tour.

After a mid-tempo start, Los Wemblers quickly picked up the pace, mixing their 40-year-old classics with new tunes that matched their exuberant spirit and experimental tendencies, relishing the opportunity to play in front of an audience diverse in both age and national identity. The band would have had the crowd dancing in the aisles had the Millennium Park security let them. Instead, they danced in their seats, enthusiastically singing along.

The sun was beginning to set behind the Chicago skyline when one of Puerto Rico’s hottest groups took the stage. Pirulo y la Tribu are a salsa band, but one that generously welcomes other influences, including its Cuban cousin timba, boricua sources both traditional (bomba) and more recent (reggaeton), and American style R&B and hip-hop. They are a perfect example of how a music moves forward and thrives without abandoning its roots. After all, that’s what salsa was in its early days, a new way of absorbing and interpreting diverse Afro-Caribbean and American sources into something new and relevant to an urban audience. It’s not all that different than what Los Wembler’s did back then and Centavrvs do today.

Francisco “Pirulo” Rosado

Francisco “Pirulo” Rosado is a percussionist by training and a showman by nature. In La Tribu, he’s assembled a 10-person juggernaut that he leads from his custom-made timbales. Pirulo keeps the pace accelerated with a clave that manages to squeeze an extra beat into the 2/3 form somewhere between the 4 & 5. The band’s lineup doesn’t stray too far from the classic: three horns, three coro singers, a conguero, keyboardist and Pirulo’s timbales. The extra jolt comes from electric guitar, bass guitar and Pirulo himself, whose gruff vocals exhort both the band and the crowd higher and higher. Once again, the audience was up and dancing pretty much from the first note. A standout moment occurred when the band switched gears to do a straight up bomba number led by coro singer Chamir Bonano’s powerful voice. There was a little tinkering for modernization’s sake, but the spirit and authenticity were a clear signifier of Pirulo’s reverence for his roots.

Pirulo y la Tribu

Pirulo’s set had people dancing throughout the park, and eventually security relented enough to allow some aisle dancing down in front. Ever the master of ceremonies, he peppered the songs with audience chant-along interludes, gradually building each to a climax before turning the band loose to keep up with his hyper-drive clave. At the end, the crowd got their “otra” without excessive delay, and the whole day closed on a very high note.

Puerto Rico, unlike the countries represented by the other bands at Súbelo, is certainly not celebrating its independence this week. There is an anniversary on the horizon, though, marking 2 years since Hurricane María devastated the island. Pirulo’s set, though, was the opposite of somber. Instead, it celebrated resilience, pride, determination, spirit, and even gratitude, all of it expressed in his audience chant, “Gracias… Thank you!”

World Music Festival Chicago continues through September 29. For a complete schedule, visit worldmusicfestivalchicago.org