Review / Preview: New Music from Dos Santos: Anti-Beat Orquesta

Dos Santos
By Don Macica –

With Fonografic, their new EP, Chicago’s Dos Santos: Anti-Beat Orquesta find themselves getting comfortable in their own skin and refining their many influences into something unique and wholly theirs. And, as is often the case, it’s the guidance of an outside producer that helps them get there.

When I first encountered Dos Santos at a Rogers Park street festival in the summer of 2013, they were practically brand new. At the time, much of their musical hat was hung on chicha, an immensely danceable and stripped-down psychedelic Peruvian variant on Colombian cumbia. You can still hear traces of cumbia rhythms and the hallucinogenic feel remains, but now a host of pan-Latin sounds and big, meaty funk and rock riffing have asserted themselves in the mix.

To record Fonografic, the band traveled to Austin, Texas and enlisted Beto Martinez of the Grammy award-winning Grupo Fantasma as producer. This assistance finds them working on a much larger aural canvas and lending the tracks an almost cinematic feel (their video for the driving twang of Camino Infernal reinforces an impression that this would make great theme music for the next twisted Robert Rodriguez epic).

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Dos Santos is, ostensibly, songwriter-guitarist-organist-singer Alex Chavez’s band, but the contributions of all five members (in addition to Chavez, there is bassist Jaime Garza, drummer Daniel Villarreal-Carrillo, conguero Pete Vale and newest member Nathan Karagianas on second guitar) loom large in the sound. The percussive tandem of Vale and Villarreal-Carrillo has gelled into a powerhouse duo, especially on the descarga ¡Cafeteando!, which features guest trombonist Mark “Speedy” Gonzales and sounds something like a lost Willie Colón track driven through a Colombian pico and turned up to maximum volume.

Two other tracks are especially notable for the way they diverge from the band’s chicha beginnings. Santa Clara is an optimistic sounding tropical Latin tune that Chavez wrote years ago, and has the sunny feel of Los Amigos Invisibles at their best. At the other end of the emotional and sonic spectrum is the second half of Red, a slow and sinister bit of R&B balladry punctuated by Chavez’ wounded howl of “Ay, amor!”.

They do all of this in seven brief tracks that total less than 30 minutes, which suggests to me that Dos Santos is anything but a self-indulgent jam band, and that every note they commit to is played with purpose. There is no doubt more where that came from, and we’ll hopefully get to hear them stretch out at this Saturday’s CD release concert for Fonografic at the Hideout. $10 gets you in, but $15 gets you in and a copy of the CD.

Dos Santos: Anti-Beat Orquesta with special guests, October 1, 9PM (doors 8:30) at The Hideout, 1354 W. Wabansia Ave, Chicago. Tickets at Ticketfly.
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About the author: Don Macica is Agúzate’s content manager, a marketing consultant to the performing arts community and a contributing writer to several online publications. When not traveling, he lives a stone’s throw from Lake Michigan in Chicago’s Rogers Park neighborhood. He also writes Border Radio, a blog about music, migration and cultural exchange.

Oscar Perez and Carlos Henriquez: Directions in Latin Jazz

Two emerging artists of Caribbean heritage take divergent paths to making their mark on jazz.

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By Don Macica

A pair of terrific Latin jazz albums were released last fall that I meant to review for Agúzate, but never quite got around to because of the high level of activity on Chicago’s Afro-Latin scene. The parade of local and visiting artists took much of my focus and tended to set the agenda for what I was covering. Having said that, though, both of these albums were never very far from my iPod rotation, and they’re still there today. So, before 2015 slips into the haze of history (and Chicago’s scene heats up again), I thought you might want to know about them.

Both Oscar Perez and Carlos Henriquez are New Yorkers, Perez from a Cuban family growing up in Queens and Henriquez a Bronx-born Nuyorican. And both, at this point, have been professional musicians for well over 15 years, although the path they each took to get to this point in their respective careers is quite different. Pianist Perez released his first album, Nuevo Comienzo, back in 2007. His new album, Prepare a Place for Me, is his third, and with it he continues to develop a style in which his Cuban roots are present, but generally not deployed as obvious signifiers. Henriquez, by contrast, spent the last 15 or so years as a sideman, primarily as the bassist in Wynton Marsalis’ Septet as well as the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra. The Bronx Pyramid is his first album as a leader. With his impeccable jazz bona fides firmly in hand, Henriquez used his debut to fully embrace Afro-Latin sounds and rhythms.

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Oscar Perez studied with Panamanian pianist Danilo Pérez, and it shows in his approach to composing and playing. If you listen to Danilo’s early CDs, they have a more typical Latin jazz structure and feel, but since then, he’s charted a highly individualistic course, and Oscar Perez is on a similar trajectory. He shows his hand early, opening Prepare a Place for Me with a straight-ahead rendering of a tune named Just Everything, a song that he first recorded close to 10 years ago in a bolero style under the Spanish title Solamente Todo. He follows that up with the most Latin sounding track on the album, a Cuban-inflected take on Thelonius Monk’s Round Midnight, perhaps paying tribute to his mentor Danilo Pérez, who recorded the same tune in an entirely different manner on his breakthrough album Panamonk in 1996.

Headin’ Over is the perfect soundtrack for a classy stroll through Manhattan, while Snake Charmer generates heat with a tune as twisty as it’s namesake lizard. By and large, though, Prepare a Place for Me simmers, a primarily piano-bass-drums affair augmented by the superbly expressive alto sax of Bruce Williams. At times, the album reminds me of the more introspective work of Miguel Zenón (and by extension his pianist Luis Perdomo), a musician that eschews the category of ‘Latin jazz’ in favor of a broader jazz approach that is nonetheless profoundly shaped by his Puerto Rican heritage.

There’s one other standard on the album, an exquisite and intricate rendering of Hoagy Carmichael’s The Nearness of You. It’s followed by the title track in a manner that almost suggests a suite. Things get a bit livelier for the Brazil-tinged Mushroom City before concluding with the elegiac Song for Ofelia, which Perez wrote in honor of his grandmother.

Carlos Henriquez proudly stamps his debut with the soul, sound and culture of his Afro-Puerto Rican heritage and Bronx roots. After years of being a sideman on something like 50 straight ahead, pop, Latin jazz and salsa projects, not to mention his fifteen plus years with Wynton Marsalis, it goes without saying that his bass playing is superb. I first heard Henriquez’s quintet when he opened for Eddie Palmieri exactly a year ago at Symphony Center, and their set was good enough for me to briefly forget I was there to see el maestro.  On Bronx Pyramid, Henriquez channels his playing and composing into a convincingly personal statement of identity.

The title track features the Cuban batá drumming of guest percussionist Pedrito Martinez. Chuchfrito is an appropriately greasy riff on Latin boogaloo. Descarga Entre Amigos is just that, an infectious salsa jam that features Rubén Blades on vocals. Joshua’s Dream is a gorgeous bolero that Henriquez wrote for his young son. Al Fin Te Vin is a charming danzón conceived as a duet for bowed bass and trumpet.

The album continues in this vein, a musical tour of Latin America (or perhaps simply the Bronx) touching on bomba, guaracha, rumba and more. There are a couple of relatively straight ahead tunes as well, including the lovely ballad Nilda, written in honor of Henriquez’s mom, and the hard swinging Eye of the Gemini, a “bonus track” that likely earns its designation because it didn’t quite fit the album’s themes, but was too good to leave off.

Two New Yorkers of Caribbean descent, two distinct approaches to Latin jazz, both producing deeply felt albums that reveal more with every listen. So, quick, before Chicago gets too busy again: Check them out.

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Oscar Perez, Prepare a Place for Me (Myna Records)

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Carlos Henriquez, The Bronx Pyramid (Blue Engine)
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About the author: Don Macica is the founder of Home Base Arts Marketing Services and a contributing writer to several online publications, including Agúzate and Arte y Vida Chicago. He is the author of Border Radio, a blog about music, migration and cultural exchange.