Concert review: Herencia de Timbiquí at Segundo Ruiz Belvis Cultural Center


By Don Macica, Photos by Charlie Billups –

When it all comes together, magic can happen.

Segundo Ruiz Belvis Cultural Center played host to the Old Town School of Folk Music’s Extended Play series Thursday night with a performance by Herencia de Timbiquí, a 10-person ensemble from Colombia’s Pacifico region who are already major stars in their home country but are just beginning to attract a global following. Their music derives from the African culture that dominates that region, specifically the currualo style, which is traditionally performed on percussion instruments and accompanied by call & response vocals. Like much Afro-Caribbean music, its roots lie in religious and ceremonial music.

Herencia de Timbiquí (Timbiquí is a small coastal town) preserves this core, building much of their sound around the marimba, guasá (a kind of shaker formed from a hollowed out log filled with dried seeds), and two or three drums of varying pitches. Indeed, the origins of the group lie in playing this traditional music, but beginning about a decade ago they modernized the sound with the addition of electric bass, guitar and keyboards plus a full drum kit and a horn section. They have since evolved into a polished professional ensemble whose sound is commercial enough to have one of their songs, Te Invito, become the theme of the Colombian-produced Netflix series La Niña. This contemporary approach has enough room for smooth urban balladry, rock and funk while remaining firmly anchored in those traditional percussive elements.

Full video of the hit single “Sabrás”, performed live at SRBCC.

Every element of this was fully on display at SRBCC. A song could start out sounding very contemporary, only to have the steady currualo heartbeat and melodic marimba become evident as the song progresses. Conversely, a folkloric beginning could suddenly explode with punchy horns or a virtuoso guitar solo. The group is fronted by two extremely charismatic vocalists who connected directly and repeatedly to a dancing and swaying audience that was mere feet away from SRBCC’s low-slung stage.

All of which is to say that Herencia de Timbiquí has the potential to be pan-Latin superstars with a universal appeal that nonetheless operates in the specific and identifiable context of traditional Afro-Colombian culture.


And that magic? What elevated this particular performance from great to something greater was the context. Herencia was preceded on stage by groups performing purely folkloric music and dance representing Afro-Mexican, Afro-Colombian and Afro-Puerto Rican traditions. SRBCC is generally Puerto Rico focused in its programming, but one can also sense the spirit of Ramón Emeterio Betances, a colleague of Segundo Ruiz Belvis and a mid-19th century Puerto Rican doctor, diplomat and abolitionist who was known as El Antillano because of his vision of a united, decolonized Caribbean identity. The center’s walls are adorned with paintings and artwork representative of the Puerto Rican experience, and among them is a portrait of another Puerto Rican patriot, Pedro Albizu Campos, flanked by Cuba’s José Martí and Mexico’s Emiliano Zapata.


Chicago’s Colombian community turned out in force to see Herencia de Timbiquí, joining Puerto Ricans and more generally fans of Latin and world music for an evening that, if only briefly, accomplished Betances dream of a united Caribbean. I think Herencia could sense they were part of something special that transcended entertainment and entered the realm of spiritual uplift and pure joy.

It sure sounded like it.

Carlos Vives at the Rosemont Theatre


By Charlie Billups –

[Ed. Note: Good music is good music, regardless of your relationship to it. Sometimes, though, it’s best to go with something more personal when reviewing an artist so popular as to be almost a human embodiment of an entire country. Agúzate photographer Charlie Billups attended the recent concert by Colombia’s Carlos Vives with his entire family. His lightly edited impressions of a memorable evening follow.]
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I have waited a very long time to see Carlos Vives perform live and it was worth the wait. Even before the concert started, the feeling was like a festival. I felt that I was in Colombia at Las Fiestas de Santa Marta. Most of those in attendance wore Colombian colors or Sombreros Vueltiaos. Vives emerged without an introduction to sing “Ahi llego yo” and everyone was immediately on their feet singing and shouting to the song. It felt like a religious event. For those there it was a great moment of Colombian and Latin American pride.

Carlos’s performance was very polished and it did not reflect at all that the previous night’s performance in Radio City Music Hall in NYC was just the first show of an eight-city U.S. tour. Most of the numbers in the performance had a very strong accordion lead coupled with Colombian Gaitas. The sound was rich and soulful with no flaws, mixed with very strong accents of pop and rock and strong playing by all members of the band, including new accordionist Christian Camilo Peña, who was voted a Vallenato King in 2008, particularly on the number “La Cañaguatera” which was masterful beyond any level of skill. It felt like Colombia itself to me. I was somehow transported to Valledupar even though I have never been there.

The climax of the concert came when he performed “Bailar contigo”, truly a remarkable emotional number with video filmed in historic Cienaga, Magdalena. Emotions at this point were topped out.

The concert concluded with a five-song encore and the final number “La bicicleta” in which Carlos entered the stage in his own bicycle to the adulation of fans.

Carlos Vives continues to be at his prime as part of the top three of Colombia along with Shakira and Juanes. Not only does his musical skill shine but a human part as well, he continues to unite Colombia and Latinos beyond.

Interview: Travels with Monsieur Periné


By Don Macica –

Bogotá, Colombia’s capital city, is where it all comes together. Like urban centers everywhere, it attracts people from both rural areas and smaller towns. It is where traditions meet and are fused with energy and experimentation to become something new.

In 2007, university student Catalina Garcia, who was studying anthropology, met Nicolás Junca and Santiago Prieto, a pair of aspiring musicians enthralled by French gypsy jazz. She joined the duo as a singer and they began playing informally for friends at parties, weddings and other gatherings. Catalina was studying French as well, so her language skills and the duo’s musical direction were a perfect fit. Thus was born Monsieur Periné, likely the world’s first and only Colombian gypsy jazz band.

They began performing professionally a few years later. In 2012 they recorded and released their first album, Hecho en Mano, and began to attract attention beyond Colombia. Their second album, Caja de Musica, featured an expanded musical palette and was produced by Eduado Cabra, whom you may know better as Visitante of Calle 13.

“When we recorded our first album, we still hadn’t performed much outside of Colombia.” I’m speaking by phone with Catalina Garcia during a break in rehearsals for a North American tour that will bring them to Thalia Hall in Chicago this Wednesday, March 22. “Our songs were limited a bit by that, although we brought in other Latin influences like boleros. So what we were doing mostly was blending French gypsy jazz with Colombian folkloric sounds, especially in percussion.”

Garcia continues, “That album gave us a chance to tour outside of Colombia and we used those travels as a journal of ideas and impressions when we started working on Caja de Musica. We were very lucky that Eduardo Cabra noticed us and offered to produce, because he had done considerable traveling throughout Latin America to explore those sounds for Calle 13. It was a good fit, and he was a big help in bringing those instruments in and building the songs.”


The results were successful artistically and commercially. You can still hear the gypsy jazz influence on Caja de Musica, but now it is (if I could use a cooking metaphor) a broth to which several other spices and ingredients have been carefully added, resulting in a pan-Latin sancocho where reggae riddims overlay French strumming and jaunty Venezuelan clarinets sit alongside Argentine charango, all of it filtered through Monsieur Periné’s sunny sound.

It was a sound good enough to earn Monsieur Periné a Latin Grammy for Best New Artist in 2015. The band, which has grown to 8 members, is just now beginning to compose songs for its follow up. “We’ve now toured both Europe and North America,” says Garcia. “We’re reaching audiences that aren’t necessarily fans of Latin American music, and we’re meeting and learning from them. We are really excited to be coming back to the United States because there are people from different nationalities and backgrounds that identify with our music. It’s a beautiful place to play.”

The final stop on Monsieur Periné’s 2016 tour was at Pilsen Fest, where they wowed a large audience late into the night, blowing past the curfew that usually closes down street festivals at 10pm. Live, their music takes on yet a third dimension, as they play lengthy instrumental build ups to their songs and follow with extensive soloing in their midsections. Somehow, they make traditional Colombian rhythms one with Benny Goodman’s Sing, Sing, Sing.

It’s great, then, that the first stop on this tour is back in Pilsen, just a bit down 18th Street at the crown jewel of Chicago’s mid-sized music venues. They’ll likely road test some new songs, as they hope to begin recording the new album in June. Garcia tells me that they are working with collaborators on the new songs.  “We did all the composing on our first two albums by ourselves, but this time we want to work with other artists that we admire. Some of them are Colombian, but some are also from other parts of the world. We are looking for ways to learn from other kinds of music than ours. We want to continue to enrich our sound.”
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Monsieur Periné with Dos Santos Anti-Beat Orquesta and Los Gold Fires
Wednesday, March 22, 8PM at Thalia Hall, 1807 S. Allport, Chicago
Tickets at thaliahallchicago.com

Extended Play: Crossing neighborhood borders with a world of music

Herencia de Timbiquí

By Don Macica –

If you live in Chicago and experience live Latin and world music on a regular basis, chances are you know, or at least have seen, Mateo Mulcahy. If you recognize the name, it’s because you know he’s the guy who brings all the cool world music to the Old Town School of Folk Music, located in the city’s north side Lincoln Square neighborhood.

Unlike a commercial talent booker or promoter, though, Mulcahy has a broader mission. The Old Town School is a non-for-profit organization, and Mulcahy is its Director of Community Projects and Events. He’s leading a new initiative called Extended Play that launches on February 1 in partnership with institutions in two other parts of the city; The DuSable Museum of African American History on the south side in Hyde Park and Segundo Ruiz Belvis Cultural Center in Hermosa on the west side.

Mateo Mulcahy was born in Chicago. He has both Mexico and Ireland in his heritage and grew up in a bilingual household. He spent several years in St. Louis leading a salsa band, hosting a radio show, promoting live Latin and world music and even owning a nightclub. These various capacities allowed him to make connections with that city’s various ethnic communities and continually expand his network. At times he reproduced shows in St. Louis that originated at the Old Town School’s La Peña series. Upon returning to Chicago in 2006, he was hired by the School to take over La Peña, but his background of working with many diverse communities led to him also programming the School’s Afro-Folk series and being assigned the broader task of connecting the School to communities beyond its immediate geographical area and to create more diversity at the school itself.

Mateo Mulcahy

“We (the Old Town School) pull almost exclusively from a 20 block radius of the building,” Mulcahy tells me over coffee in the school’s main performance hall. “but we always have had an interest in expanding our reach into the south and west sides. Early on I took Afro-Folk out to the South Shore Cultural Center and we hoped to extend classes out there as well.”  That effort ran out of funding pretty quickly, and Mulcahy has been searching for a way ever since to do something similar.

The Old Town School’s reputation beyond Chicago is highly regarded. “I can’t tell you how many artists that I work with say that they wish their cities had something like the Old Town School. New York City, London, Memphis, it doesn’t matter,” says Mulcahy. “There might be programs there that do something similar, but their focus is usually narrower, aimed at a particular community. The Old Town School’s mission tries to reach out to all of Chicago’s communities. We are the largest community arts school in the country.”

Even so, Mulcahy recognizes that there is unequal distribution of arts activity and education in Chicago. “There’s our 20 block radius, but virtually 90% of the city’s arts organizations are either downtown or on the north side like us. Vast parts of the city get very little.”

Cooperation between the Old Town School and community partners is crucial. A recently created 2 person engagement department has made these citywide partnerships more feasible. Last year’s 77 Beats program sought to celebrate the music and food of Chicago’s 77 distinct neighborhoods by producing over 45 events throughout the city in everything from cultural centers to parks and festivals, often utilizing the resources and talent in those neighborhoods.

Extended Play, which will bring Afro-Latin artists to Chicago this year, is a further step in that direction. As its name implies, the series extends the School’s long-running World Music Wednesday to three days and two additional venues. “We need to partner with organizations in other parts of the city and not keep everything to ourselves over there,” he says, gesturing toward the darkened stage. “Correspondingly, it is a benefit for the artists who come a long way to perform in Chicago to get the opportunity to play more than once.” Like 77 Beats, Extended Play is funded by the Chicago Community Trust, who have in recent years begun to focus more on the city’s under served neighborhoods.

El Tuyero Ilustrado

The partner organization’s missions are crucial to the programming decisions as well. Artists are selected in close consultation with partner venues to ensure that they reflect the programming objectives and mission of all institutions. In the case of this year’s launch of Extended Play, the thread that connects the DuSable Museum and Segundo Ruiz Belvis is the African Diaspora. The initial artists that will perform include El Tuyero Ilustrado, who play joropo music from Venezuela, and Colombia’s Herencia de Timbiquí. Artists perform for three consecutive days. In keeping with outreach goals, all concerts are free to the public.

“I can’t tell you how pleased I am that I was able to get artists of this high caliber to launch this series,” Mulcahy says with a big smile. “Herencia de Timbiquí are superstars in Colombia, and El Tuyero Ilustrado are truly at the forefront of the joropo tuyero movement.”

Like a lot of Chicagoans, I first heard Herencia de Timbiquí at last year’s World Music Festival, and their show at Pritzker Pavilion was one of my personal fest high points. The 10-man ensemble mines a rich vein of traditional rhythms and instruments from Colombia’s Afro-Pacific region while modernizing it just enough to not sound like an anthropology lesson. They will be here in April.

El Tuyero Ilustrado, who kick off the series this Wednesday, are making their first appearance in Chicago. The duo consists of cuatro virtuoso Edward Ramírez and composer/singer/maraca player Rafa Pino. The project combines the joropo from the central region of Venezuela with original songwriting and uses the cuatro as a main instrument, rather than the more traditional arpa llanero.

Mulcahy discovered them at a music conference in Caracas and was totally blown away. “Venezuela has an incredibly diverse and rich musical offering,” says Mulcahy, “but joropo is the national music and the cuatro is definitely the national instrument. However, if you are going to replace a harp which has dozens of strings with a cuatro that has 4, it better be one incredible cuatro player. Edward Ramírez is at that level.”

Mulcahy and I end our conversation talking about Chicago’s world music community. “I’ve worked in other markets,” he says, “and I’m very happy to report that, in Chicago, the people who work on the cultural side of Latin and world music all get along and collaborate. It’s not a given that it works like that in other places. And working together enables us to get great artists to come to Chicago that individually we couldn’t afford.”

Extended Play works much the same way. It would simply not be possible to get El Tuyero Ilustrado or Herencia de Timbiquí to come all the way to Chicago for a single audience of a few hundred people. That makes us a very lucky city indeed.
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Extended Play: El Tuyero Ilustrado
Old Town School of Folk Music, Wednesday February 1 at 8:30pm. oldtownschool.org
DuSable Museum of African American History, Thursday February 2 at 7pm. dusablemuseum.org
Segundo Ruiz Belvis Cultural Center, Friday February 3 at 7:30pm. segundoruizbelvis.org

Extended Play: Herencia de Timbiquí

Old Town School of Folk Music, Wednesday April 19 at 8:30pm
Segundo Ruiz Belvis Cultural Center, Thursday April 20 at 7:30pm
DuSable Museum of African American History, Friday April 21 at 7pm

Colombian Fest: It’s not a festival, it’s a verbena

By Parker Asmann –

In the distance a tall, white party tent extends far above the fence line and into a cloudless sky. With every step the microphones and instruments being sound checked start to sound more like a Tejano band from Texas. Nearly in perfect unison, Jorge Ortega and his team of sound technicians are running around meticulously preparing for their latest event. With only a week until Colombian Fest one would think this had something to do with the festival, but today is just a typical birthday celebration for Ortega.

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Jorge Ortega

Colombian Fest, the Midwest’s largest celebration of Colombian music and culture, returns to the Copernicus Center July 16-17 for their second annual festival. Coinciding with Colombian Independence Day, the festival will include legendary and contemporary musicians directly from Colombia as well as artists from Chicago’s thriving Colombian community. From cumbia, vallenato and champeta to currulao and salsa, the festival highlights the richness and diversity of Colombian music and culture.

Ortega, the festival’s director and founder, was born in the seaport town of Barranquilla, in the Atlantico of Colombia. Known for its enormous carnival celebrations equipped with costumed performers and cumbia music, Ortega had to rely on his parents and uncles to understand and experience that Colombian culture after moving to the United States at a young age.

carnaval2
Carnaval in Barranquilla

Every weekend Ortega’s father would have loud music from every region in Colombia singing throughout the house, blasting until the wee hours of the morning. While he wasn’t taking notes on what his father had playing in the house, Ortega would be carefully combing through his uncle’s record collection filled with Colombian artists he had brought with him to the United States.

At family parties when his uncle got tired of being in control of the music, Ortega was left to command the sound system as the adults around him danced and sang into the night.

“My parents would have a party and the adults would be doing their thing and the only one left playing with the music was me,” Ortega said. “I was young, my uncle would just let me go ahead and play the music. I was always right there with the sound system.”

Since the age of 18, Ortega has been surrounded by music and has worked countless music festivals. With over 30 years working as a sound engineer and production manager, Ortega and his partner Luis Garcia decided that hosting their own music festival was the next appropriate step to take.

“Colombian Fest started about four years ago,” Ortega said. “We did a picnic in a forest preserve on Irving Park and Cumberland, I think it was for my birthday since it’s a couple days after Colombian Independence on July 20.”

After receiving positive feedback from the first picnic, Ortega decided to hold another picnic the following year, only this time with about double the amount of people. Before long, what started out as a small picnic transformed itself into a full blown music festival.

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Colombian culture is anything but simple. From Colombia’s Pacific coast to the interior plains and mountains, and on to the shores of the Caribbean, to its African, Spanish and indigenous roots, Colombia’s diversity is showcased both geographically and culturally. Arguably the epicenter of Latin America, Colombia’s identity is unavoidably influenced by and exported to its neighbors. All of this leaves Ortega with one big question: How could he possibly incorporate all of this diversity into two days?

For Ortega, it all started with the verbenas in Colombia that his parents would describe in stories of their time spent enjoying them. Throughout the ‘50s, ‘60s, ‘70s and ‘80s in Barranquilla, Ortega’s parents would frequent the verbenas, popular street parties along Colombia’s Atlantic coast. At the verbenas in Barranquilla, it was as if all of the musical and cultural influences that had shaped Colombia had fallen onto one town.

“The music was introduced in the barrios and the streets of Barranquilla through these sound systems called pickups, or picos for short,” Ortega said. “And that music would come through the boats. With Barranquilla being a port town, a lot of the music that came from Haiti, Jamaica, the United States, Africa and France, all that music came in through the boats.”

Soon enough, Colombian verbenas developed a certain ebb and flow to them that Ortega saw replicated at his parents’ parties.

“Those were the early verbenas, they would play cumbia, vallenato, salsa, African music, and then the African music transitioned into champeta,” Ortega said. “It’s a mix, and I grew up with that mix.”

Anibal-Velasquez
Anibal Velasquez

That mix that Ortega grew up with is showcased in the Colombian artists and local Chicago bands that are slated to perform at this year’s festival. One of the most notable musicians is 80-year-old Anibal Velasquez y Los Locos del Swing. Also a native of Barranquilla, Velasquez universalized the accordion and introduced a livelier form of cumbia known as the Colombian Guaracha. His innovations influenced music in  Colombia and throughout Latin America. In Mexico, it’s known as cumbia sonidero.

Also accompanying Velasquez on the list of elite musicians and performers from Colombia are the salsa orchestra Sonora Carruseles and champeta master Charles King. All three of these performers will be receiving Colombian Heritage Awards at the festival for their lifetime of cultural contributions.

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Ecos del Pacífico Afrocolombiano

While some of Colombia’s native talent will be on full display, a variety of other acts from around the world and Chicago will also be exhibiting their abilities. Chicago’s own Diana Mosquera Ensemble, Ecos del Pacífico Afrocolombiano and Tierra Colombiana Folkloric Dance Company will be highlighting Chicago’s own Colombian heritage.

Ortega is particularly excited about a couple new additions to this year’s lineup, especially Explosión Negra from Colombia’s Pacific coast, representing a new evolution in Colombian music, mixing it with urban hip-hop and Jamaican dancehall, uniting three strains of African music in the Americas.

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Explosión Negra

“Here in Chicago you have a Colombian community that’s pretty diverse,” Ortega said. “You have a mix of Colombians that are from the coast, from Bogota, Medellin, and so with the festival we try and have a little bit of everything.”

Representing all of Colombia’s different cultural and musical identities is important to Ortega and the festival’s organizers, but what’s more important is maintaining and providing the type of sound quality that’s needed to really appreciate the intricacies of the music being performed.

Producing the festival will be LD Audio, one of the largest concert and festival production companies in the Midwest. As head of production management, Ortega and LD Audio owner Luis Garcia have made a commitment to ensuring that the sound quality of the festival exceeds everyone’s expectations. In Ortega’s words, “it’s a ‘sound guys’ festival.”

“My background is as a sound engineer and a production manager for many years, I’ve toured with many big Latin American artists,” Ortega said. “LD Audio and myself have more than 30 years of experience with sound engineering and production.

“We have a level of professionalism and expertise, and we have to bring that because it’s our festival, we’re representing our country, our Colombia.”

Colombia is African, it’s Spanish and it’s indigenous. There are foods and traditions that are entirely unique to a particularly region that can’t be found anywhere else in the country. Colombia is a fusion, a blending of cultures, tastes, and best of all, musical styles. Ortega isn’t focused on having the biggest festival that gains the most attention; he’s committed to having the highest quality festival that displays just how diverse his Colombian culture is. He wants you to experience his verbena.

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Colombian Fest (2015)

“This is not a festival, it’s a verbena, a carnival. You want to experience our verbena, come to Colombian Fest.”

Colombian Fest / El Gran Festival Colombiano, July 16-17, Copernicus Center, 5216 W. Lawrence Avenue, Chicago colombianfestchicago.com
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About the author: Parker Asmann is a freelance reporter based in Chicago focusing on Latin America and the Latinx community. His work has been featured in El BeiSMan and In These Times magazine, as well as The Yucatan Times and San Miguel Times in México.

 

Meridian Brothers lead off Colombian musical invasion.

By Don Macica.

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This is turning out to be a remarkable summer for Colombian music in Chicago. Ondatrópica headlines Millennium Park, Systema Solar graces the Celebrate Clark Street Festival, Bomba Estéreo celebrates their brand new CD with a show at Concord Music Hall, and El Gran Festival Colombiano brings both traditionalists Los Gaiteros de San Jacinto and champeta group Tribu Baharú to town.

But before we knew all that, though, we knew this. The Meridian Brothers make their Chicago debut at Mayne Stage on June 21 during their first ever U.S. tour. And that, friends, is news.

To clear a couple of things up right off the bat, there are no brothers nor is there anyone named Meridian in the group. It more or less started as a home-made recording project when Colombian guitarist and composer Eblis Alvarez started layering his guitar over drums, percussion and other folkloric instruments that he taught himself to play. After years of this, he went to Denmark to study at the Royal Danish Academy of Music and at the Danish Institute of Electronic Music. Returning to Bogotá in 1998, he began releasing these recordings of distorted tropical sounds, and a group was needed in order to perform them live. The Meridian Brothers (band) was born, even as recordings continue to be entirely created by Alvarez. Over the years, the group has evolved into a five-piece band focused on re-interpreting all manners of Latin Tropical rhythms (cumbia, vallenato, salsa, merengue, guaguanco etc..) with a pronounced psychedelic and experimental sensibility. In 2014, Meridian Brothers released their third album, the engagingly loopy Salvadora Robot.

Something that becomes apparent on close listen to the Meridian Brothers is that, despite the weirdness, psychedelia and surrealist lyrics, the tunes themselves are pretty faithful to their sources. A cumbia is a cumbia, vallenato is vallenato. But what comes out is something like Frank Zappa playing doo-wop or Captain Beefheart playing blues. Just as you can hear those artists’ deep respect for their sources, you can likewise hear the same from Alvarez once you accustom yourself to the overall sound.

When asked about the name Meridian Brothers in an interview last year, Eblis Alvarez replied, “I love pseudonyms, people not knowing who is making things.” Reading this, I was prompted to reach out to a Colombian friend who maintains a series of online aliases. He has one identity on his Facebook page, another on his enigmatic website, and still a third when he sends e-mails. And those are the ones I know about. None of these, of course, are his real name.

When I asked him what he heard in the Meridian Brothers, he was similarly enigmatic, comparing them to, of all things, the Violent Femmes. “Meridian Brothers play music within the leisure sense, not in the cerebral sense, without falling into the pop formula” he wrote, continuing, “Their lyrics speak of local things in a very local language, so local that [it] doesn’t sound like Spanish, without falling into the ghetto language formula.” He also advised me that “I should know what Chucu-Chucu music means and have [an] appreciation for the analog psychedelic sounds.” Well, I got that last one down (shoot, I grew up on that stuff), but the rest required some work.

Chucu-Chucu is, as best as I can tell, a rough Colombian counterpart to salsa in New York City in the 60’s and 70’s, a musical style with roots in the Caribbean but urban in character, with just a touch of silliness, like something a wedding band might play in Bogotá. (I could be wrong about this, though… a YouTube search of Chucu-Chucu also turns up children’s songs and booty-shaking dembow.) And the Violent Femmes… well, you can take them simply as wacky guys playing punk rock on acoustic guitars, or you can appreciate them as artists with a very particular sensibility, creating totally honest and plain-spoken art.

As for the Meridian Brothers, you can take them either way, too. Live, you are quite likely to experience a serious desire to dance to the tropical rhythms even as you grin at the skewed sonics and visuals. There will, if you want, be plenty to think about, but who ever spent time thinking at a Violent Femmes show?

Better to simply surrender to the fun.


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Sound Culture presents the Meridian Brothers at Mayne Stage, Sunday June 21, 7:30pm (doors 6:30). DJs Agúzate and ((SONORAMA)) get the party started. Tickets and info at soundculturechicago.com.
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About the author: Don Macica is the founder of Home Base Arts Marketing Services and a contributing writer to several online publications, including Agúzate and Arte y Vida Chicago. He is the author of Border Radio, a blog about music, migration and cultural exchange.