Agúzate interview: Miguel Zenón’s Típico


By Don Macica –

Beginning with Jibaro in 2005, Puerto Rican saxophonist Miguel Zenón has conceived and recorded a series of albums built on the Puerto Rican experience. Both Jibaro and 2009’s Esta Plena explored folkloric sources, while 2014’s Alma Adentro interpreted classics from the golden age of Puerto Rican songwriting by such luminaries as Rafael Hernández, Sylvia Rexach and Pedro Flores.  2014 saw the remarkable Identities are Changeable, which based its compositions not on musical sources, but interviews with Puerto Ricans born in the mainland United States that explored their sense of identity.

Each was progressively more complex than the previous. Jibaro was simply a quartet. Esta Plena added additional percussion and Alma Adentro utilized a string ensemble. Identities was a big band album. At the core of all four, though, was Zenón’s quartet. The title of his brand new album, Típico, might lead you to believe that it is a continuation of this conceptually themed series, but it is instead a more purely musical project that takes as its starting point the core experience of that working quartet since 2005: pianist Luis Perdomo, Henry Cole on drums and bassist Hans Glawischnig.

“The title ‘Típico’ refers to something that is customary to a region or a group of people or something that can be related to a specific group of people. And when I was writing the music, I was thinking about the music that identified us as a band.”

I’m speaking with Miguel Zenón by phone as he is preparing to take the quartet to California for the first leg of a Típico tour that will bring him to Chicago’s Jazz Showcase March 9-12.


“I wanted to go back to that initial idea of just writing something for the band and focusing on the things that I feel the band can do well and use the record as a showcase for that.” Zenón continues, “The way we usually put records together, even when there are large ensembles or conceptually bigger projects, they all start with the quartet. The other elements are added to that, but when we go out on tour it’s usually just the quartet again. So this time, when putting this record together, I thought about the music as not just the first layer of a bigger project, but with the band itself as the main attraction.”

In a few of the album’s tracks, sounds and ideas initially created by individual band members figure in the new compositions.  On “Corteza”, Zenón based the melody on a Glawischnig’s bass solo first heard on Esta Plena. “Entre las Raíces” started with a Luis Perdomo piano solo on his album Awareness, while “Las Ramas” takes its starting point from figures that drummer Henry Cole has developed over the years that include his Afrobeat Collective album Roots Before Branches.

I ask Zenón if it’s fair to say that Típico is a more purely musical record. “There definitely isn’t a grand concept on this record. I wanted to do something that was more reflective of our experience as a band. If there’s a concept at all, it’s modern music written for a specific group of players that have developed a language together that we use to communicate with each other and create something that we can communicate to a listener.”

The idea of communicating to a listener interests me. Zenón’s music is quite intricate and carefully planned, but as a listener I’m not thinking about complex time signatures or harmonic cadences. If anything, music provokes a human response, be it pleasure, thoughtfulness, serenity, etc.  I tell Zenón this and ask him to comment on the dynamic between composer, player and listener.

“When I’m putting music together, I’m trying to do it out of a place of truth and an honest representation of who I am. So it really needs to be ‘me’. A lot of things that we do start as ideas or systems or exercises, technical things, but then you want to put that in a context where it relates to a listener. There’s a balance needed between an intellectual level and a more human, sentimental point of view if it’s going to reach someone else besides us. My process is a slow one of putting together various ideas and conceptual things, but then I look for ways to add elements to the mix so I can communicate to other people. “

The ‘típico’ of Típico is this culture that exists within the Miguel Zenón Quartet, and not a reference to a geographical region. The compositions themselves have their origin in Zenón’s experience as both an observer and participant in this culture, with few obvious outside points of reference. There are sonic moments that jump out at me: The studio layering of multiple saxophone and bass lines that open “Ciclo”; a simple and very human whistle that opens the increasingly complex variations of “Las Ramas”; 30 seconds or so of in the pocket vamping from drummer Henry Cole in “Corteza”; the delicate intro to “Cantor”.

None of these compositions are likely to bring to mind Latin music. There are, however, two tracks that do conjure this feeling, one deliberately and the other, I believe, naturally flowing out of Zenón’s Puerto Rican heritage.

The lovely melody at the heart of Sangre de mi Sangre (inspired by Zenón watching his daughter play in a park) has a lyrical beauty that sounds like it could have appeared on Alma Adentro.  “I actually wrote lyrics to that melody when I first sketched it out. I was watching her play and thinking about our connection, then also thinking about my parents and how they probably felt about me when I was young,” Zenón continues, “In a sense, the version that appears on the record resulted from the same sort of process that I used on Alma Adentro – start with the melody of an existing song, then build a new arrangement from that. We’ve never played it with the lyrics, but I always think about them when I play it.”

The title track makes explicit reference to Latin folkloric music. “I was trying to capture a specific feeling of folklore, specifically this harmonic cadence that I recognize in a lot of the music I like from Latin America. I played around with this cadence a lot of different ways and combined it with different elements and rhythms. Even though it is an original composition, it evokes that folkloric sound when you hear it.”

I jokingly tell Zenón that the piano intro to “Típico” sounds like a montuno played upside down, but to my surprise he readily agrees. “That’s exactly what it is,” he says. “We’re trying to play around with it, sort of like it’s a mirage of something that’s there, but at the same time, not there. I was trying to emulate a feeling I get when I listen to that music, but not the actual music itself.”

Miguel Zenón is no stranger to Chicago. He was here twice in 2016. In the spring he presented Identities are Changeable in concert at the Logan Center and conducted a discussion and performance of its themes and sources at Segundo Ruiz Belvis Cultural Center. He returned to Chicago in early fall to perform Yo Soy La Tradición, a world premiere work for saxophone and string quartet, at the Hyde Park Jazz Festival. The Miguel Zenón Quartet, however, hasn’t been at the intimate confines of the Jazz Showcase since 2015. When I spoke to Zenón prior to that appearance, he said, “I feel honored that we have become part of the musical family at the Jazz Showcase for so many years now. (Showcase owners) Joe and Wayne (Segal) have a long history of supporting younger bandleaders, especially Latin American musicians such as Danilo Pérez and David Sánchez, both of whom have already become such an integral part of the history of the club. I look forward to performing at this great venue for many years to come.”

Better now than later.
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Miguel Zenón Quartet, Jazz Showcase March 9-12. Shows at 8 & 10pm plus 4pm all ages matinee on Sunday. Info and advance tickets at jazzshowcase.com.

Luciano Antonio’s Brazilian jazz finds its audience


– By Don Macica

“I was finding myself in Chicago every weekend, commuting from Kansas City, because Chicago was where the opportunity to play was.”

I’m speaking with Luciano Antonio, who has quietly but steadily become a major force in Chicago’s Brazilian music scene.  Born in the rural town of Iretama in the southern Brazilian state of Parana, Antonio has been performing here since 1994. The first decade or so of that was playing guitar in existing ensembles like Chicago Samba, Bossa Tres and Orquesta de Samba, but eventually he began to step out as a bandleader in his own right, releasing his first album of original music, Vida de Arista (An Artist’s Life), in 2011. A second album, Sem Palavras (Without Words), followed in 2015.

Luciano, who was born into a musical family, taught himself to play guitar at the age of 14. He initially focused on Brazilian folk and Bossa Nova, but was soon studying classical guitar, eventually heading to the United States and Kansas City, earning a Bachelor of Music degree at the University of Missouri. It was there he met the leader of Chicago Samba, Moacyr Marchini, who invited him to join the group. By 1999, what started out as a few trips a year turned into a weekly gig. “I would travel here every Thursday afternoon, play the gig, sleep for a an hour and a half at the drummer’s house, then fly back to Kansas City in the morning because I couldn’t miss class.”

He continues, “Chicago Samba is a party band and plays everything: Bossa Nova, pagode, axé, Olodum, fricote… I still play all of that with my dance group project, Planeta Azul, but my original music tends to be a little quieter, music designed for listening instead of dancing.”

In 2002, Luciano finally moved here. Chicago is now home, the place he returns to after his tours Italy, China, and Brazil. If you go out for live music in Chicago, chances are you’ll encounter Luciano in one form or another on a regular basis. In addition to Planeta Azul, he performs as a solo singer-guitarist, in an occasional duo with the superb Brazilian vocalist Silvia Manrique, in the interesting new project AMA led by drummer Luiz Ewerling that features vocalist Ana Munteanu, and, of course, leading his own quintet.

His rigorous classical guitar study has payed off. He’s a terrific and fluid guitarist who is comfortable improvising. Additionally, Luciano is a fine singer whose voice carries that essential but hard to describe sense of Brazilian saudade.

It’s this quintet that has been playing a weeknight gig several times a year at Chicago’s renowned Jazz Showcase, where he now has a full weekend of shows scheduled starting January 26-29, a coveted spot that is usually reserved for national artists.

“Planeta Azul is meant for dancing, and I enjoy playing that kind of music very much. But at the Jazz Showcase, I can open up the music to improvisation, what is called Brazilian jazz, because I have a listening audience. I have the room to take the music where it can go.”

Luciano notes that he draws from a range of influences to compose and play this more intimate music. “Everything from the Beatles to the top artists of of Brazilian MPB (Música popular brasileira) including Milton Nascimento, Djavan, Chico Buarque, Gilberto Gil and Caetano Veloso. Some American pop and, of course, jazz.”

The Jazz Showcase quintet will include Neal Alger, one of Chicago’s best jazz guitarists, and a young Brazilian pianist, Gabriel Alves, who has studied here in Chicago with the legendary Willie Pickens. Rounding out the lineup are bassist Geoffrey Lowe and drummer Luiz Ewerling, who are also Luciano’s band mates in AMA. Joining them as special guests are vocalist Neusa Sauer and her husband Breno.

“Neusa and Breno came out of Brazil in the 1960s and settled in Chicago in the 70s. They’re both legends and Chicago is so lucky to have them. If you’ve never heard Neusa sing, you are in for a real treat. This weekend is something of a tribute to them.”

Luciano takes a moment to reflect on his time in Chicago. “I’ve been on the Chicago scene for something like 22 years. It’s really a great city, and I feel like getting a weekend at the Jazz Showcase is something of an acknowledgement that I’m a true Chicago artist.

“I’ll always love Carnaval music, dancing, high energy stuff. Samba and party music are great. But for me, personally, I want people to hear the nuances in my music, and I really appreciate that there is a place like Jazz Showcase where people will listen. The audience offers me their ears and their attention, and the challenge to me is to reward them for it by being as musical as I can.”
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Luciano Antonio Quintet with special guests Neusa and Breno Sauer.
Jazz Showcase, January 26-29, shows at 8 & 10pm.
jazzshowcase.com

Con ritmo: Agúzate’s Guide to Summer in Chicago

La banda cubana "Orishas" se reencuentra con apuesta de "revolución musical"
Orishas

By Don Macica –

Chicagoans are a hardy bunch. We suffer through what seems like endless winters because we know one thing: Summer music in Chicago is awesome! Nearly every weekend has one neighborhood festival or another.  There’s the city-owned world class concert venue Pritzker Pavilion downtown, but in recent years the neighborhood parks have stepped up big time too. Besides all the free stuff, there are also a few privately run festivals where the music to dollar ratio is especially high.

There’s something for everyone, but we have a mission here at Agúzate that keeps us focused on places where the Afro-Latin quotient is high. Here then, is our guide to where we want to be this summer.

Of course, you’re invited too!

The 606 Block Party, June 4: We start in the ‘hood, or more accurately, the four neighborhoods that Chicago’s urban trail park runs through: Bucktown, Wicker Park, Logan Square and Humboldt Park. They are celebrating their first anniversary by throwing a huge party, and the Latino flavor of the trail’s western half leads to some pretty good music. Humboldt Boulevard between Cortland and Wabansia is where you’ll find salsa orchestra Luis Palermo and the Brasa All-Stars, the Latin ska of Los Vicios de Papá, and Bomba con Buya with special guest bomba maestro Leró Martinez.  More action can be found in the smaller parks along the trail, including rumba Cubana from Iré Elese Abure, booming Brazilian samba from Bloco Maximo, Tango & folkloric music by bandoneón player Richard Scofano and even more bomba and plena with Leró Martinez, Jerry Ferrao, Arawak’Opia and saxophonist Roy McGrath.

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Bomba con Buya

Night Out in the Parks, various dates: Speaking of Roy McGrath, we’ve been following his Julia al Son de Jazz project ever since he premiered it at The 606 last year. McGrath reports that it is still growing and refining, and the public will get three more chances to check in on its progress in three spots around the city: June 24 at Fred Anderson Park in the South Loop, July 29 at Riis Park and August 26 at Gage Park. More 606 celebrants return as well, including Bomba con Buya July 25 in Blackhawk Park and Iré Elese Abure August 27 at Julia de Burgos Park. Miramar, whose new album is a tribute to Puerto Rican songwriter Sylvia Rexach, performs June 24 in Hermosa Park. Finally, AfriCaribe brings the bomba y plena to three spots as well, June 23 in Churchill Park, July 11 in Wicker Park and August 10 in Foster Park.

Millennium Park Summer Music Series, various dates: There are many reasons to spend a summer evening here, but for us, none are more essential than the Eddie Palmieri Salsa Orchestra on June 27. Opening for El Maestro is Afro-Colombian folkloric ensemble Ecos del Pacifico. Other promising shows include Brazilian singer-songwriter Rodrigo Amarante (you might recognize him from his haunting theme to Netflix’s Narcos) on June 13, Afrobeat heir Femi Kuti and Positive Force on July 11, Congolese band Mbongwana Star with local favorites Dos Santos Antibeat Orquesta on August 11 and, making up for last year’s State Department visa meltdown, highlife legend King Sunny Ade on July 18. UPDATE: Puerto Rican singer Ileana Cabra Joglar, better known as iLe, has been added on July 14.

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Eddie Palmieri

Square Roots Festival, July 8-10: The street fest version of its predecessor, the glorious Folk & Roots Festival, may never quite hit those heights of communal bliss, but the venerable Old Town School continues to bring in excellent music, and this year is no exception.  We’ll be checking out roots reggae from Taj Weekes, the Ethiopian pop of Debo Band and the classic New York Latin sound of Los Hacheros.

Chicago SummerDance, various dates: A tradition going on 20 years, this globally generous three month dance party on Chicago’s front lawn will present several local and international artists, including Angel Melendez & the 911 Mambo Orchestra, Ricardo Lemvo and Makina Loca, Los Hacheros, Ola Fresca and Carpacho y Su Super Combo.

Chicago Latin Jazz Festival, July 15-16: Make sure your Uber account is in good standing, ‘cause you’re going to need it this weekend! We’ll start off Friday night with a festival that, without fail, presents the absolute best in Latin Jazz. And though we don’t yet know what they are planning for this year, it’s a sure bet that you’ll want to see some of it. UPDATE: Legendary San Francisco percussionist and bandleader John Santos has been announced as the Friday night headliner. Juan Pastor’s Chinchano opens.

El Gran Festival Colombiano, July 16-17: Back for its second year, they are working hard to build on last summer’s great lineup with 79 year old cumbia legend Anibal Velasquez, champeta master Charles King, salsa dura from Pibo Márquez’ Salsa Caribbean All Stars, Lucho Morales y Su Fiesta Vallenato, Afro-Colombian rising stars Explosión Negra and the old school salsa orchestra Sonora Carruseles. On the DJ side you’ll find Geko Jones from the Que Bajo?! collective and festival organizer Jorge Ortega himself spinning classic vinyl.

Anibal Velasquez

Celebrate Clark Street, July 16-17: Back for its eleventh year, the music at this humble and slightly gritty festival (I can say that ‘cause it’s in my neighborhood) always turns it into something of a mini-World Music Fest. This year is no exception. We’re especially excited about Palenke SoulTribe, Sierra Leone Refugee All-Stars and the El Freaky collective.

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Sierra Leone Refugee All Stars

Evanston Ethnic Arts Festival, July 16-17: Uber goes to the suburbs, right? It is, as they say, cooler by the lake, and you can’t get any closer than at this summertime favorite. This year, check out the Cuban-Arabic-Flamenco-Gypsy Swing of Sultans of String, the Chicago Afrobeat Project, and the hard hitting Johnny Blas Afro Libre Orchestra.

Festival Cubano, August 12-14: No lineup has yet been made public, but in the past they have showcased such giants as Willy Chirino, El Gran Combo de Puerto Rico and Alfredo de la Fe. Last year brought the first visits of Cubans directly from the island, and there’s no reason to think that will stop now. UPDATE: Reunited hip-hop trio Orishas plus Albita and La India have been announced as headliners.

Chicago Jazz Festival, September 1-4: There are few better ways to end your summer than by immersing yourself in jazz at this 38 year old tradition. The Big Papi of jazz fests promises something for everyone, but we are especially excited about two performances: The experimental Afro-Latin collective James Sanders’ Proyecto Libre on Friday and the closing night concert, a Latin Jazz All Stars 95th birthday tribute to legendary Cuban conguero Candido Camero with Candido himself.

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Candido Camero

You have to come indoors sometime, and the early part of the summer provides a few excellent opportunities to do just that, including:

  • Venezuela by way of New York hedonists Los Amigos Invisibles hit Bottom Lounge June 9.
  • Darwin Noguera & Victor Garcia’s CALJE (June 10) and Colombian/New York band leader Gregorio Uribe (June 12), both at Sabor a Café Steakhouse.
  • Cuban pianist Alfredo Rodriguez Trio at the Jazz Showcase June 16-19.
  • Triple Threat! Dos Santos Antibeat Orquesta with funk/soul/reggae band Fatbook and global jazz beatmaster Makaya McCraven at Martyrs June 17.
  • São Paulo songstress CéU at City Winery June 24.
  • CD release party for Orbert Davis and the Chicago Jazz Philharmonic’s Havana Blue, June 26 at Jazz Showcase.

Of course, we haven’t even touched on World Music Festival Chicago, but that’s after Labor Day so we’re counting that in a different season.

Trust us, we will count it.

Preview: Choro das 3 at Jazz Showcase

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By Don Macica.

When my son was in the third grade, he came home from school one day and declared that he wanted to play the flute. Dutiful parents that we were, we not only enrolled him in the school band but decided that private lessons would be beneficial. We found an instructor through our local park district. That’s how I got to know a woman who was on her way to becoming an authority on a form of Brazilian music I had never heard of: choro. Upon hearing it, I fell in love. It’s lively and full of charm. If a well-played choro doesn’t coax a smile out of you, your life is much grimmer than mine.

My son’s maestra went on to study choro in Brazil under a Fulbright scholarship and published a book of interviews with choro masters based in part on her Fulbright research. Me? I just started adding choro CDs to my overstuffed shelves. So, when a friend told me that Choro das 3, a choro group from her hometown of Rio de Janeiro, was touring the U.S. with a stop in Chicago, my ears immediately perked up.

On casual listen, choro may not sound like Afro-Latin music, but its origins are very much the same. Choro is one of the earliest forms of urban music in Brazil. It’s beginnings in the late 19th century roughly parallel those of jazz in New Orleans, and for a while it was wildly popular. Just like ragtime in the United States, tango in Argentina and habanera in Cuba, choro was a result of influences of musical styles and rhythms coming from Europe and Africa. Brazil’s most revered composer (prior to Jobim, of course), Heitor Villa-Lobos, called choro “the true incarnation of Brazilian soul.” If it’s accurate to say that without ragtime there is no jazz, than it’s equally accurate to say the same of choro and, say, bossa nova. The driving ecstasy of samba, a more obvious descendent of African music, overtook choro in popularity in the mid-twentieth century, and you could say that bossa nova, with its sophisticated harmonies, refined and internationalized samba, with a little help from jazz. Choro, however, never faded away, even if it didn’t conquer the world. Like New Orleans-style jazz, it remains an important cultural touchstone.

Choro das 3 is a family band, three sisters and their dad. If that sounds corny, it’s not, and in fact it’s almost essential to understanding the soul of the music. Choro is traditionally played in informal settings called roda de choros, where people gather to share songs and play with each other, often in people’s homes. It was these rodas that kept the music alive when it was superseded in popularity by samba and bossa nova.

Choro’s main tools are similar to other music of the Americas. Its rhythmic foundation is the pandeiro, which Puerto Ricans will of course recognize as the pandero and residents of New Orleans the tambourine. It’s played much the same way in all three cultures. In Choro das 3, the father, Eduardo, plays the pandeiro and sisters Corina, Lia and Elisa play various flutes and stringed instruments. One listen to the Brazilian bandolin will instantly bring to mind similar instruments as the Puerto Rican cuatro and Cuban laud. In the hands of talented musicians, the music can reach dizzying heights of complexity. The family band that is Choro das 3 are exactly that.

Choro das 3 hit the road on May 20 to promote their newest CD, a trip that will bring them to one of the Chicago’s best rooms, the Jazz Showcase, on July 21. Part of what makes this visit special is that, despite the fact that you can go out almost any night of the week in Chicago and hear excellent Brazilian musicians, few of them perform choro, even if, as I suspect, they know it inside and out. That’s not entirely surprising, given the wider popularity of samba and bossa nova. I have little doubt that, even in Chicago, choro is still played privately among friends in rodas.

Fortunately, Choro das 3 is coming here soon to enlighten the rest of us.

Choro das 3, Jazz Showcase, Tuesday July 21. Tickets at jazzshowcase.com

About the author: Don Macica is the founder of Home Base Arts Marketing Services and a contributing writer to several online publications, including Agúzate and Arte y Vida Chicago. He is the author of Border Radio, a blog about music, migration and cultural exchange.

Miguel Zenón Live at the Jazz Showcase – Concert Review

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Miguel Zenón at the Jazz Showcase | September 19-22, 2013 | Review by Don Macica| Photos by Scott Pollard

Saxophonist Miguel Zenón brought an unusual project with him to Chicago this past weekend. Although the Santurce, Puerto Rico native often uses folkloric and other source material from the island as a basis for his compositions and arrangements, he rarely executes those ideas in an obviously Latin format. Instead, his regular quartet (which includes the extraordinary drummer Henry Cole, who brought his own Afrobeat Collective to Chicago last December) works almost exclusively on the jazz side, with Latin rhythms hinted at but not explicitly stated.

Miguel Zenón & the Rhythm Collective are something quite different, and his four nights of shows at the Jazz Showcase burned with Afro-Caribbean heat supplied by drummer Joel Mateo, bass guitarist Aldemar Valentin and especially percussionist Reinaldo de Jesus, who brought with him two tables worth of shakers, bells and other rhythm instruments to supplement his four congas. The Collective members are all from Puerto Rico, and the ensemble has played off and on for nearly a decade. A February 2011 gig in San Juan is documented on Zenón’s most recent release, Oye!!! Live in Puerto Rico.

Zenón started things off with a nod to Charlie Parker, whose image looms over the Showcase stage as both a blessing and a warning to the performers to keep it real. After that, though, it was Afro-Caribbean all the way, albeit a highly original and inventive take on the genre. Parker’s She Rote was quickly followed by not one, but two songs from Cuban nueva trova singer/composer Silvio Rodriguez, Aceitunas and El Necio. The gorgeous melodies of both tunes served as a framework for Zenón’s lyrical playing, but each song featured arrangements that ventured far into rhythmic and harmonic territory unimagined in the simple guitar and voice of Rodriguez’s originals.

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The band then made a statement of purpose with a Zenón composition called The Chain that explored the African-derived commonalities of music from across the Caribbean: Puerto Rico, Cuba, Jamaica, Dominican Republic, even Honduras & Belize, with Zenón taking a short break from his horn to beat out a solid bomba rhythm alongside de Jesus.  Next up was another original, Hypnotized, a quietly intense and rhythmically subtle piece inspired by the late jazz drummer Paul Motian.

The first set closed by linking Motian to another important percussionist and bandleader, Tito Puente, with an unusual arrangement of his classic Oye Como Va. Fragments of the melody were repeated until they became nearly a chant as Zenón and the Collective nimbly moved back and forth between different time signatures, stopping, starting and sub-dividing the foundation that Puente built the song on.

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The second set was more of the same, mixing original compositions with well chosen covers.  After another Parker tribute, the band launched into Yuba #1, based on the bomba drum pattern of the same name, but sounding something like Chicago style free jazz.  Among the originals were Variations on an Afro-Cuban Theme and two songs from Oye!!!, JOSNigeria and Double Edge.  Zenón formed the Rhythm Collective 10 years ago for a U.S. State Department sponsored tour of West Africa.  JOS, inspired by that tour, proved to be one of the most straightforward tunes of the night as de Jesus provided a solid yet understated intimation of Fela Kuti’s signature Afrobeat rhythm, supported by Valentin’s supple bass, leaving room for Zenón to creatively reimagine Fela’s iconic saxophone runs. This segued directly into Double Edge which prominently featured layered and juxtaposed rhythms of remarkable precision, bringing the evening to a spectacular close.

Zenón told me that he’s taking his regular quartet into the studio soon along with a big band to record music from his ambitious Identities: Tales from the Diaspora project. Here’s hoping that the Chicago Jazz Festival or some other organization can find the resources to bring the live version to Chicago sometime soon.

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Don Macica is a marketing consultant to the performing arts community and a contributing writer to several online publications including Chicagomusic.org and Arteyvidachicago.com. When not traveling, he lives a stone’s throw from Lake Michigan in Chicago’s Rogers Park neighborhood. He is the author of Border Radio, a blog about music, migration and cultural exchange.