Freddy Quintero’s journey from Venezuela to Chicago

– By Don Macica –

Up until a few years ago, Brett Benteler was one of the elite Latin jazz bass players in Chicago.  In 2015, though, he moved to New York City to further his musical ambitions. Before he did so, he told bandleaders and club owners not to worry: He knew a guy.

It was right around then that I started seeing this kid playing funky yet intricate electric bass guitar with bands like Roy McGrath’s Latin Sextet, Eric Hines & Pan Dulce and others. As it turns out, a newly arrived to Chicago Freddy Quintero was that guy.

Since then, I’ve seen Quintero play with several more bands, including the Chicago Afro-Latin Jazz Ensemble, James Sanders & Conjunto, the Humboldt Park Orchestra, the Luciano Antonio Quartet and even supporting the New York/Colombian singer songwriter Gregorio Uribe on a solo trip to Chicago sans his Big Band. This Thursday, the young Venezuelan bassist takes another step forward by joining Cuban pianist Chuchito Valdés for a four-night stand at Chicago’s legendary Jazz Showcase.

When I said “kid” above I was not exaggerating. Quintero moved to Chicago in 2015 at the age of 19 and I was seeing him play shortly after that. I finally got a chance to talk with him a bit last summer, and I followed that conversation up this week with a few more questions. How did this kid become fully integrated into Chicago’s Latin and salsa scene in just a couple of years?

Freddy Quintero with Eric Hines & Pan Dulce

“I first came to Chicago because, while attending a music seminar in 2012, I met a group of musicians that were part of a program called ‘The Abreu Fellowship’ from the New England Conservatory, and one of these musicians helped me to find a full-tuition scholarship at North Park University,” says Quintero. “However, I could not come to Chicago during that time due to many reasons, and not being able to speak English was the most crucial. Three years later my father sent me to Chicago to study English at an ESL program with the intentions of getting back the offer from NPU, but the scholarship was not available anymore.”

Quintero continues, “I didn’t know anyone when I moved to the city besides that one person that I kept in touch with from North Park University. When I arrived to Chicago, they sent me an invitation to participate in a meeting where I met Brett Benteler, and I would say that everything started right after that. I got my first gig subbing out for Brett with a Latin jazz band called Contrabanda. I remember being super nervous because I thought that we were going to have a rehearsal or at least they would send me the sheet music, but it never really happened. Nonetheless, I think I did a good job. After the gig, I made some connections with the musicians who later invited me to sit in with a salsa band at Sabor a Café. A couple the months later, Benteler moved to New York City and he decided to leave all his gigs with me. I believe this is how more people started to call me to play with them. First, they would say that Brett recommended me. Then, they would just ask if I was available to play with them, and I guess this is when I realized that I must have been doing something good and that I was already part of the music scene in Chicago.”

I’m curious as to how someone so young made such an impression on Benteler and other musicians, so I ask Freddy about growing up in Venezuela. “My formal music education started when I was twelve years old in my hometown Punto Fijo, Venezuela. I was very fortunate to be part of El Sistema (Venezuela’s internationally renowned national music program) where I had the opportunity to perform with different orchestras and conductors for several years until I decided to move to the United States. My education within El Sistema was strictly classical. The instrument that I chose to play was the upright bass, and I remember being the only child playing that huge instrument at my nucleo, which is what the El Sistema programs are called around the country.”

Young Freddy in Venezuela

When I point out that he is obviously not making his reputation as a classical musician in Chicago, Quintero tells me “El Sistema helped me a lot with my music reading and basic concepts of theory, so it was a very smooth transition by the time I decided to play the bass guitar. Although my formal education was classical, on my own time I would play rock with a band I had, and years later a group of friends and I gathered to create what it was the first big band in the history of my city, the Falcon Latin Jazz Big Band. I would say that jazz was one of the last genres that I ended up discovering and I feel it was sort of magical. The first recording I remember listening to was Spain by Chick Corea from his album Light as a Feather. After that I just wanted to keep digging to find new jazz artists.”

Quintero cites several artists as influences, from classical composers to rock, salsa and jazz bands, including over a dozen bassists from across the musical spectrum. When I ask him how he views himself, he states “I consider myself as a musician that is capable of playing different styles of music and enjoying all of them at the same time. I grew up in a house listening to Venezuelan music every morning, Pop, Rock, Funk and R&B in the afternoon, and Latin music at night. So, this is how I see myself, as a musician with no limits. “


Quintero is grateful for the strong foundation that El Sistema provided him, and credits it for his success so far. “I was very fortunate to be part of El Sistema because I believe that most of the musicians that come from that music program have a strong foundation in discipline, respect, perseverance, humility, and musicality that sometimes is really hard to find in others. In my personal opinion, this is really the only way I was able to be introduced to people like Victor Garcia and his band the Chicago Afro-Latin Jazz Ensemble, where I have learned and I keep learning every time I have the opportunity to perform with them.”

In addition to all of this performing, Freddy is finally back at school as well, majoring in Music Education at Northeastern Illinois University.

Quintero appreciates the unique quality of the music scene in Chicago, saying “You never know when you are about to play with a famous or really good musician because there are no boundaries, meaning that the only mission is to play the gig, not to discuss who has more gigs, or a bigger house, you know?  This is why I strongly believe that preparation is everything.”

Chuchito Valdés

That brings us to playing with Chuchito Valdés. “Working with an artist such as Chuchito has been a blessing. Just recently I had the honor to play with him at Yoshi’s, a legendary jazz club located in Oakland, California. When he called me to do that gig, I couldn’t believe it. For the same reason, I am extremely grateful that someone like Chuchito trusts in the work that I do. Hopefully we will keep touring the US, and this is going to be just the beginning of something bigger.”

So, I ask him, what can we expect from this weekend’s Chuchito Valdés shows?

“I would say that the music will lean towards both jazz and Latin directions and probably some funk, too. The drummer for the gig will be Luis Prieto Rosario. He is an amazing drummer and a great timbalero.”

I’m there!
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Chuchito Valdés Trio with Freddy Quintero and Luis Prieto Rosario
Jazz Showcase, January 25-28. Two shows nightly plus Sunday matinee
jazzshowcsase.com

Extended Play: Crossing neighborhood borders with a world of music

Herencia de Timbiquí

By Don Macica –

If you live in Chicago and experience live Latin and world music on a regular basis, chances are you know, or at least have seen, Mateo Mulcahy. If you recognize the name, it’s because you know he’s the guy who brings all the cool world music to the Old Town School of Folk Music, located in the city’s north side Lincoln Square neighborhood.

Unlike a commercial talent booker or promoter, though, Mulcahy has a broader mission. The Old Town School is a non-for-profit organization, and Mulcahy is its Director of Community Projects and Events. He’s leading a new initiative called Extended Play that launches on February 1 in partnership with institutions in two other parts of the city; The DuSable Museum of African American History on the south side in Hyde Park and Segundo Ruiz Belvis Cultural Center in Hermosa on the west side.

Mateo Mulcahy was born in Chicago. He has both Mexico and Ireland in his heritage and grew up in a bilingual household. He spent several years in St. Louis leading a salsa band, hosting a radio show, promoting live Latin and world music and even owning a nightclub. These various capacities allowed him to make connections with that city’s various ethnic communities and continually expand his network. At times he reproduced shows in St. Louis that originated at the Old Town School’s La Peña series. Upon returning to Chicago in 2006, he was hired by the School to take over La Peña, but his background of working with many diverse communities led to him also programming the School’s Afro-Folk series and being assigned the broader task of connecting the School to communities beyond its immediate geographical area and to create more diversity at the school itself.

Mateo Mulcahy

“We (the Old Town School) pull almost exclusively from a 20 block radius of the building,” Mulcahy tells me over coffee in the school’s main performance hall. “but we always have had an interest in expanding our reach into the south and west sides. Early on I took Afro-Folk out to the South Shore Cultural Center and we hoped to extend classes out there as well.”  That effort ran out of funding pretty quickly, and Mulcahy has been searching for a way ever since to do something similar.

The Old Town School’s reputation beyond Chicago is highly regarded. “I can’t tell you how many artists that I work with say that they wish their cities had something like the Old Town School. New York City, London, Memphis, it doesn’t matter,” says Mulcahy. “There might be programs there that do something similar, but their focus is usually narrower, aimed at a particular community. The Old Town School’s mission tries to reach out to all of Chicago’s communities. We are the largest community arts school in the country.”

Even so, Mulcahy recognizes that there is unequal distribution of arts activity and education in Chicago. “There’s our 20 block radius, but virtually 90% of the city’s arts organizations are either downtown or on the north side like us. Vast parts of the city get very little.”

Cooperation between the Old Town School and community partners is crucial. A recently created 2 person engagement department has made these citywide partnerships more feasible. Last year’s 77 Beats program sought to celebrate the music and food of Chicago’s 77 distinct neighborhoods by producing over 45 events throughout the city in everything from cultural centers to parks and festivals, often utilizing the resources and talent in those neighborhoods.

Extended Play, which will bring Afro-Latin artists to Chicago this year, is a further step in that direction. As its name implies, the series extends the School’s long-running World Music Wednesday to three days and two additional venues. “We need to partner with organizations in other parts of the city and not keep everything to ourselves over there,” he says, gesturing toward the darkened stage. “Correspondingly, it is a benefit for the artists who come a long way to perform in Chicago to get the opportunity to play more than once.” Like 77 Beats, Extended Play is funded by the Chicago Community Trust, who have in recent years begun to focus more on the city’s under served neighborhoods.

El Tuyero Ilustrado

The partner organization’s missions are crucial to the programming decisions as well. Artists are selected in close consultation with partner venues to ensure that they reflect the programming objectives and mission of all institutions. In the case of this year’s launch of Extended Play, the thread that connects the DuSable Museum and Segundo Ruiz Belvis is the African Diaspora. The initial artists that will perform include El Tuyero Ilustrado, who play joropo music from Venezuela, and Colombia’s Herencia de Timbiquí. Artists perform for three consecutive days. In keeping with outreach goals, all concerts are free to the public.

“I can’t tell you how pleased I am that I was able to get artists of this high caliber to launch this series,” Mulcahy says with a big smile. “Herencia de Timbiquí are superstars in Colombia, and El Tuyero Ilustrado are truly at the forefront of the joropo tuyero movement.”

Like a lot of Chicagoans, I first heard Herencia de Timbiquí at last year’s World Music Festival, and their show at Pritzker Pavilion was one of my personal fest high points. The 10-man ensemble mines a rich vein of traditional rhythms and instruments from Colombia’s Afro-Pacific region while modernizing it just enough to not sound like an anthropology lesson. They will be here in April.

El Tuyero Ilustrado, who kick off the series this Wednesday, are making their first appearance in Chicago. The duo consists of cuatro virtuoso Edward Ramírez and composer/singer/maraca player Rafa Pino. The project combines the joropo from the central region of Venezuela with original songwriting and uses the cuatro as a main instrument, rather than the more traditional arpa llanero.

Mulcahy discovered them at a music conference in Caracas and was totally blown away. “Venezuela has an incredibly diverse and rich musical offering,” says Mulcahy, “but joropo is the national music and the cuatro is definitely the national instrument. However, if you are going to replace a harp which has dozens of strings with a cuatro that has 4, it better be one incredible cuatro player. Edward Ramírez is at that level.”

Mulcahy and I end our conversation talking about Chicago’s world music community. “I’ve worked in other markets,” he says, “and I’m very happy to report that, in Chicago, the people who work on the cultural side of Latin and world music all get along and collaborate. It’s not a given that it works like that in other places. And working together enables us to get great artists to come to Chicago that individually we couldn’t afford.”

Extended Play works much the same way. It would simply not be possible to get El Tuyero Ilustrado or Herencia de Timbiquí to come all the way to Chicago for a single audience of a few hundred people. That makes us a very lucky city indeed.
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Extended Play: El Tuyero Ilustrado
Old Town School of Folk Music, Wednesday February 1 at 8:30pm. oldtownschool.org
DuSable Museum of African American History, Thursday February 2 at 7pm. dusablemuseum.org
Segundo Ruiz Belvis Cultural Center, Friday February 3 at 7:30pm. segundoruizbelvis.org

Extended Play: Herencia de Timbiquí

Old Town School of Folk Music, Wednesday April 19 at 8:30pm
Segundo Ruiz Belvis Cultural Center, Thursday April 20 at 7:30pm
DuSable Museum of African American History, Friday April 21 at 7pm